Individual differences in self-assessed health: An information-processing investigation of health and illness cognition

Paula G. Williams, Michelle S. Wasserman, Andrew J. Lotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 2 studies, the relation between measures of self-assessed health (SAH) and automatic processing of health-relevant information was investigated. In Study 1, 84 male and 86 female undergraduate students completed a modified Stroop task. Results indicated that participants with poorer SAH showed enhanced interference effects for illness versus non-illness words. In Study 2, 27 male and 30 female undergraduate students completed a self-referent encoding task, Results offered a conceptual replication and extension of Study 1 by confirming the specificity of the relation between SAH measures and automatic processing of health (vs. negative or positive general trait) information, These studies provide evidence that individual differences in SAH are reflected in schematic processing of health-relevant information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Health cognition
  • Physical symptoms
  • Self-assessed health
  • Stroop

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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