Infants with upper respiratory illnesses have significant reductions in maximal expiratory flow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied maximal expiratory flows at functional residual capacity (V̇maxFRC) obtained by use of the chest compression technique in 9 infants who had signs of upper respiratory illness (URI) at the time of testing, and in 9 infants who were symptom‐free but whose parents reported they had a URI in the previous month. When compared to 109 infants with no URI, infants with current URI had 40% lower V̇maxFRC (mean±SD: 125.7 ± 54.5 mL/s vs. 73.6 ± 53.6 mL/s; P < 0.01). Infants with a past URI had mean values for V̇maxFRC (120.2 ± 50.2 mL/s) that were not significantly different from those of infants with no URI. Changes in the shape of the flow‐volume loop analogous to those reported in infants with lower airway obstruction were also noticed in infants with current URI. These findings suggest that, as in older children and adults, clinically unapparent alterations in lower airway function occur during URI in infants. Pediatr Pulmonal 1990; 9:91–95.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-95
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric pulmonology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Keywords

  • Partial expiratory flow volume curves, chest compression technique
  • current vs. past URI, effect of
  • upper vs. lower airway dysfunction, clinical manifestation of dysfunctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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