Infectious myonecrosis virus has a totivirus-like, 120-subunit capsid, but with fiber complexes at the fivefold axes

Jinghua Tang, Wendy F. Ochoa, Robert S. Sinkovits, Bonnie T. Poulos, Said A. Ghabrial, Donald V. Lightner, Timothy S. Baker, Max L. Nibert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) is an emerging pathogen of penaeid shrimp in global aquaculture. Tentatively assigned to family Totiviridae, it has a nonsegmented dsRNA genome of 7,560 bp and an isometric capsid of the 901-aa major capsid protein. We used electron cryomicroscopy and 3D image reconstruction to examine the IMNV virion at 8.0-Å resolution. Results reveal a totivirus-like, 120-subunit T = 1 capsid, 450 Å in diameter, but with fiber complexes protruding a further 80 Å at the fivefold axes. These protrusions likely mediate roles in the extracellular transmission and pathogenesis of IMNV, capabilities not shared by most other totiviruses. The IMNV structure is also notable in that the genome is centrally organized in five or six concentric shells. Within each of these shells, the densities alternate between a dodecahedral frame that connects the threefold axes vs. concentration around the fivefold axes, implying certain regularities in the RNA packing scheme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17526-17531
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume105
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 11 2008

Keywords

  • Electron cryomicroscopy
  • Nonenveloped virus
  • Penaeid shrimp
  • Totiviridae
  • dsRNA virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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