Influence of attendance at day care on the common cold from birth through 13 years of age

Thomas M. Ball, Catharine J. Holberg, Michael B. Aldous, Fernando Martinez, Anne L Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe trends in the occurrence of the common cold during the first 13 years of life among children who attended different childcare settings early in life. Design: The Tucson Children's Respiratory Study involves 1246 children enrolled at birth and followed up prospectively since May 1980 through October 1984. Children with data regarding day care use during the first 3 years of life were included in this investigation (n = 991). Parents reported the occurrence of frequent (≥4) colds during the past year by questionnaire when each child was 2, 3, 6, 8, 11, and 13 years of age. Child care at home (no unrelated children), at small day care (1-5 unrelated children), or at large day care (≥6 unrelated children) was reported retrospectively by parental questionnaire when the children were approximately 6 years old. Results: After adjusting for potential confounding variables, compared with children at home those in large day care had more frequent colds at year 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.4; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-0.9;P=.02) through 11 (OR, 0.4, 95% CI, 0.1-1.2; P=.09), and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 1.0, 95% CI, 0.3-3.8; P=.95). In addition, compared with children in large day care for 1 year or less those attending large day care for more than 2 years had more frequent colds at year 2 (OR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.5, 95% CI, 0.2-1.1;P=.08), 8 (OR, 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.04), and 11 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.05); and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 0.9, 95% CI, 0.3-2.9; P =.80). Conclusions: Attendance at large day care was associated with more common colds during the preschool years. However, it was found to protect against the common cold during the early school years, presumably through acquired immunity. This protection waned by 13 years of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-126
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume156
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Common Cold
Parturition
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Adaptive Immunity
Child Care
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Influence of attendance at day care on the common cold from birth through 13 years of age. / Ball, Thomas M.; Holberg, Catharine J.; Aldous, Michael B.; Martinez, Fernando; Wright, Anne L.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 156, No. 2, 2002, p. 121-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b1c60d9f89744904a606b94b9af417e6,
title = "Influence of attendance at day care on the common cold from birth through 13 years of age",
abstract = "Objective: To describe trends in the occurrence of the common cold during the first 13 years of life among children who attended different childcare settings early in life. Design: The Tucson Children's Respiratory Study involves 1246 children enrolled at birth and followed up prospectively since May 1980 through October 1984. Children with data regarding day care use during the first 3 years of life were included in this investigation (n = 991). Parents reported the occurrence of frequent (≥4) colds during the past year by questionnaire when each child was 2, 3, 6, 8, 11, and 13 years of age. Child care at home (no unrelated children), at small day care (1-5 unrelated children), or at large day care (≥6 unrelated children) was reported retrospectively by parental questionnaire when the children were approximately 6 years old. Results: After adjusting for potential confounding variables, compared with children at home those in large day care had more frequent colds at year 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.9, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.4; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.3, 95{\%} CI, 0.1-0.9;P=.02) through 11 (OR, 0.4, 95{\%} CI, 0.1-1.2; P=.09), and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 1.0, 95{\%} CI, 0.3-3.8; P=.95). In addition, compared with children in large day care for 1 year or less those attending large day care for more than 2 years had more frequent colds at year 2 (OR, 1.7, 95{\%} CI, 1.0-3.0; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.5, 95{\%} CI, 0.2-1.1;P=.08), 8 (OR, 0.2, 95{\%} CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.04), and 11 (OR, 0.3, 95{\%} CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.05); and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 0.9, 95{\%} CI, 0.3-2.9; P =.80). Conclusions: Attendance at large day care was associated with more common colds during the preschool years. However, it was found to protect against the common cold during the early school years, presumably through acquired immunity. This protection waned by 13 years of age.",
author = "Ball, {Thomas M.} and Holberg, {Catharine J.} and Aldous, {Michael B.} and Fernando Martinez and Wright, {Anne L}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "156",
pages = "121--126",
journal = "JAMA Pediatrics",
issn = "2168-6203",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of attendance at day care on the common cold from birth through 13 years of age

AU - Ball, Thomas M.

AU - Holberg, Catharine J.

AU - Aldous, Michael B.

AU - Martinez, Fernando

AU - Wright, Anne L

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Objective: To describe trends in the occurrence of the common cold during the first 13 years of life among children who attended different childcare settings early in life. Design: The Tucson Children's Respiratory Study involves 1246 children enrolled at birth and followed up prospectively since May 1980 through October 1984. Children with data regarding day care use during the first 3 years of life were included in this investigation (n = 991). Parents reported the occurrence of frequent (≥4) colds during the past year by questionnaire when each child was 2, 3, 6, 8, 11, and 13 years of age. Child care at home (no unrelated children), at small day care (1-5 unrelated children), or at large day care (≥6 unrelated children) was reported retrospectively by parental questionnaire when the children were approximately 6 years old. Results: After adjusting for potential confounding variables, compared with children at home those in large day care had more frequent colds at year 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.4; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-0.9;P=.02) through 11 (OR, 0.4, 95% CI, 0.1-1.2; P=.09), and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 1.0, 95% CI, 0.3-3.8; P=.95). In addition, compared with children in large day care for 1 year or less those attending large day care for more than 2 years had more frequent colds at year 2 (OR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.5, 95% CI, 0.2-1.1;P=.08), 8 (OR, 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.04), and 11 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.05); and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 0.9, 95% CI, 0.3-2.9; P =.80). Conclusions: Attendance at large day care was associated with more common colds during the preschool years. However, it was found to protect against the common cold during the early school years, presumably through acquired immunity. This protection waned by 13 years of age.

AB - Objective: To describe trends in the occurrence of the common cold during the first 13 years of life among children who attended different childcare settings early in life. Design: The Tucson Children's Respiratory Study involves 1246 children enrolled at birth and followed up prospectively since May 1980 through October 1984. Children with data regarding day care use during the first 3 years of life were included in this investigation (n = 991). Parents reported the occurrence of frequent (≥4) colds during the past year by questionnaire when each child was 2, 3, 6, 8, 11, and 13 years of age. Child care at home (no unrelated children), at small day care (1-5 unrelated children), or at large day care (≥6 unrelated children) was reported retrospectively by parental questionnaire when the children were approximately 6 years old. Results: After adjusting for potential confounding variables, compared with children at home those in large day care had more frequent colds at year 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.4; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-0.9;P=.02) through 11 (OR, 0.4, 95% CI, 0.1-1.2; P=.09), and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 1.0, 95% CI, 0.3-3.8; P=.95). In addition, compared with children in large day care for 1 year or less those attending large day care for more than 2 years had more frequent colds at year 2 (OR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0; P=.04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.5, 95% CI, 0.2-1.1;P=.08), 8 (OR, 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.04), and 11 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P =.05); and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 0.9, 95% CI, 0.3-2.9; P =.80). Conclusions: Attendance at large day care was associated with more common colds during the preschool years. However, it was found to protect against the common cold during the early school years, presumably through acquired immunity. This protection waned by 13 years of age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036154398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036154398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11814371

AN - SCOPUS:0036154398

VL - 156

SP - 121

EP - 126

JO - JAMA Pediatrics

JF - JAMA Pediatrics

SN - 2168-6203

IS - 2

ER -