Influence of snow cover duration on soil evaporation and respiration efflux in mixed-conifer ecosystems

Krystine Nelson, Shirley Papuga, Grace John, Rebecca Minor, Greg A Barron-Gafford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems are dependent on snowfall, which is expected to decrease under projected climate change. Changes in snowpack are likely to have important consequences for water and carbon cycling in these and downstream ecosystems. Particularly within semi-arid environments, snowpack changes will directly influence localized water and carbon dynamics and indirectly influence regional-scale levels of water availability and carbon sequestration. In this study, we monitor soil evaporation (E) and soil respiration (R) and evaluate how snow cover affects these effluxes within a mixed-conifer ecosystem within the Santa Catalina Mountains about 10km north of Tucson, Arizona. Using time-lapse digital photos, we identified areas of consistent short and long snow duration, and we monitored E and R in these areas every 2weeks for 15months. Our primary findings include the following: (1) Dynamics of E are not different between long and short snow season sites, (2) E for both short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil moisture and a poor relationship with soil temperature, (3) dynamics of R vary between long and short snow season sites throughout the year, with short snow season fluxes typically higher than those of long snow season sites, and (4) R for short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil temperature and a poor relationship with soil moisture. Because climate change will only exacerbate both drying-wetting and cooling-warming cycles, detangling these complex relationships becomes increasingly important for understanding shifts in carbon dynamics in these subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-880
Number of pages12
JournalEcohydrology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

snowpack
snow cover
snow
conifers
coniferous tree
evaporation
respiration
duration
ecosystems
ecosystem
soil
soil temperature
carbon
soil moisture
soil water
climate change
arid environment
soil respiration
water
dry environmental conditions

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Critical zone
  • Sky island
  • Snow ecohydrology
  • Soil moisture
  • Soil temperature
  • Subalpine
  • Time-lapse digital images

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Ecology

Cite this

Influence of snow cover duration on soil evaporation and respiration efflux in mixed-conifer ecosystems. / Nelson, Krystine; Papuga, Shirley; John, Grace; Minor, Rebecca; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.

In: Ecohydrology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014, p. 869-880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{642ae1b7d6ae4250b320118b180aeccf,
title = "Influence of snow cover duration on soil evaporation and respiration efflux in mixed-conifer ecosystems",
abstract = "Subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems are dependent on snowfall, which is expected to decrease under projected climate change. Changes in snowpack are likely to have important consequences for water and carbon cycling in these and downstream ecosystems. Particularly within semi-arid environments, snowpack changes will directly influence localized water and carbon dynamics and indirectly influence regional-scale levels of water availability and carbon sequestration. In this study, we monitor soil evaporation (E) and soil respiration (R) and evaluate how snow cover affects these effluxes within a mixed-conifer ecosystem within the Santa Catalina Mountains about 10km north of Tucson, Arizona. Using time-lapse digital photos, we identified areas of consistent short and long snow duration, and we monitored E and R in these areas every 2weeks for 15months. Our primary findings include the following: (1) Dynamics of E are not different between long and short snow season sites, (2) E for both short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil moisture and a poor relationship with soil temperature, (3) dynamics of R vary between long and short snow season sites throughout the year, with short snow season fluxes typically higher than those of long snow season sites, and (4) R for short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil temperature and a poor relationship with soil moisture. Because climate change will only exacerbate both drying-wetting and cooling-warming cycles, detangling these complex relationships becomes increasingly important for understanding shifts in carbon dynamics in these subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems.",
keywords = "Carbon dioxide, Critical zone, Sky island, Snow ecohydrology, Soil moisture, Soil temperature, Subalpine, Time-lapse digital images",
author = "Krystine Nelson and Shirley Papuga and Grace John and Rebecca Minor and Barron-Gafford, {Greg A}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/eco.1425",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "869--880",
journal = "Ecohydrology",
issn = "1936-0584",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of snow cover duration on soil evaporation and respiration efflux in mixed-conifer ecosystems

AU - Nelson, Krystine

AU - Papuga, Shirley

AU - John, Grace

AU - Minor, Rebecca

AU - Barron-Gafford, Greg A

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems are dependent on snowfall, which is expected to decrease under projected climate change. Changes in snowpack are likely to have important consequences for water and carbon cycling in these and downstream ecosystems. Particularly within semi-arid environments, snowpack changes will directly influence localized water and carbon dynamics and indirectly influence regional-scale levels of water availability and carbon sequestration. In this study, we monitor soil evaporation (E) and soil respiration (R) and evaluate how snow cover affects these effluxes within a mixed-conifer ecosystem within the Santa Catalina Mountains about 10km north of Tucson, Arizona. Using time-lapse digital photos, we identified areas of consistent short and long snow duration, and we monitored E and R in these areas every 2weeks for 15months. Our primary findings include the following: (1) Dynamics of E are not different between long and short snow season sites, (2) E for both short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil moisture and a poor relationship with soil temperature, (3) dynamics of R vary between long and short snow season sites throughout the year, with short snow season fluxes typically higher than those of long snow season sites, and (4) R for short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil temperature and a poor relationship with soil moisture. Because climate change will only exacerbate both drying-wetting and cooling-warming cycles, detangling these complex relationships becomes increasingly important for understanding shifts in carbon dynamics in these subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems.

AB - Subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems are dependent on snowfall, which is expected to decrease under projected climate change. Changes in snowpack are likely to have important consequences for water and carbon cycling in these and downstream ecosystems. Particularly within semi-arid environments, snowpack changes will directly influence localized water and carbon dynamics and indirectly influence regional-scale levels of water availability and carbon sequestration. In this study, we monitor soil evaporation (E) and soil respiration (R) and evaluate how snow cover affects these effluxes within a mixed-conifer ecosystem within the Santa Catalina Mountains about 10km north of Tucson, Arizona. Using time-lapse digital photos, we identified areas of consistent short and long snow duration, and we monitored E and R in these areas every 2weeks for 15months. Our primary findings include the following: (1) Dynamics of E are not different between long and short snow season sites, (2) E for both short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil moisture and a poor relationship with soil temperature, (3) dynamics of R vary between long and short snow season sites throughout the year, with short snow season fluxes typically higher than those of long snow season sites, and (4) R for short and long snow seasons has a strong relationship with soil temperature and a poor relationship with soil moisture. Because climate change will only exacerbate both drying-wetting and cooling-warming cycles, detangling these complex relationships becomes increasingly important for understanding shifts in carbon dynamics in these subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems.

KW - Carbon dioxide

KW - Critical zone

KW - Sky island

KW - Snow ecohydrology

KW - Soil moisture

KW - Soil temperature

KW - Subalpine

KW - Time-lapse digital images

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84897561827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84897561827&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/eco.1425

DO - 10.1002/eco.1425

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 869

EP - 880

JO - Ecohydrology

JF - Ecohydrology

SN - 1936-0584

IS - 2

ER -