Influence of terrain aspect on water partitioning, vegetation structure and vegetation greening in high-elevation catchments in northern New Mexico

Xavier Zapata-Rios, Paul Brooks, Peter A Troch, Jennifer McIntosh, Qinghua Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated vegetation structure, water partitioning dynamics and vegetation greening from 2000 through 2012 in three catchments draining north and east aspects of Redondo Peak in northern New Mexico. Vegetation structure was quantified from 1-m lidar data, while vegetation greening was quantified using remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Hydrological partitioning at the catchment scale was estimated with a metric of catchment-scale water fluxes and vegetation water use [Horton index (HI)]. The predominantly north-facing catchment, when compared with the other two eastern catchments, receives less solar radiation, exhibits less forest cover and smaller biomass and has more surface run-off (~15% of P) as a consequence of a smaller vaporization (85% of P) and smaller vegetation water consumption (HI=0·85). Moreover, the north-facing catchment showed smaller peak NDVI values (5·98) and shorter growing season length (121days) as a consequence of energy limitation. In contrast, the two eastern catchments receive larger solar radiation and have more biomass and forest cover (>76%), smaller surface run-off (90% P) and vegetation water consumption (HI=0·95). The eastern catchments had larger vegetation greening (6·28-6·58) and a longer growing season (148-160days). Snowpack conditions, such as maximum snow water equivalent and duration of the snow on the ground, explain over 95% of water partitioning (HI) that in turn influenced annual vegetation greening (R2=0·48-0·67; p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEcohydrology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

vegetation structure
partitioning
catchment
vegetation
water
forest cover
NDVI
snow
solar radiation
growing season
runoff
lidar
snow water equivalent
vaporization
biomass
snowpack
volatilization
water use
duration
index

Keywords

  • Aspect
  • Horton index
  • Hydrological partitioning
  • Mountain catchments
  • NDVI
  • New Mexico
  • Vegetation structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Ecology

Cite this

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title = "Influence of terrain aspect on water partitioning, vegetation structure and vegetation greening in high-elevation catchments in northern New Mexico",
abstract = "We investigated vegetation structure, water partitioning dynamics and vegetation greening from 2000 through 2012 in three catchments draining north and east aspects of Redondo Peak in northern New Mexico. Vegetation structure was quantified from 1-m lidar data, while vegetation greening was quantified using remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Hydrological partitioning at the catchment scale was estimated with a metric of catchment-scale water fluxes and vegetation water use [Horton index (HI)]. The predominantly north-facing catchment, when compared with the other two eastern catchments, receives less solar radiation, exhibits less forest cover and smaller biomass and has more surface run-off (~15{\%} of P) as a consequence of a smaller vaporization (85{\%} of P) and smaller vegetation water consumption (HI=0·85). Moreover, the north-facing catchment showed smaller peak NDVI values (5·98) and shorter growing season length (121days) as a consequence of energy limitation. In contrast, the two eastern catchments receive larger solar radiation and have more biomass and forest cover (>76{\%}), smaller surface run-off (90{\%} P) and vegetation water consumption (HI=0·95). The eastern catchments had larger vegetation greening (6·28-6·58) and a longer growing season (148-160days). Snowpack conditions, such as maximum snow water equivalent and duration of the snow on the ground, explain over 95{\%} of water partitioning (HI) that in turn influenced annual vegetation greening (R2=0·48-0·67; p",
keywords = "Aspect, Horton index, Hydrological partitioning, Mountain catchments, NDVI, New Mexico, Vegetation structure",
author = "Xavier Zapata-Rios and Paul Brooks and Troch, {Peter A} and Jennifer McIntosh and Qinghua Guo",
year = "2015",
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T1 - Influence of terrain aspect on water partitioning, vegetation structure and vegetation greening in high-elevation catchments in northern New Mexico

AU - Zapata-Rios, Xavier

AU - Brooks, Paul

AU - Troch, Peter A

AU - McIntosh, Jennifer

AU - Guo, Qinghua

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - We investigated vegetation structure, water partitioning dynamics and vegetation greening from 2000 through 2012 in three catchments draining north and east aspects of Redondo Peak in northern New Mexico. Vegetation structure was quantified from 1-m lidar data, while vegetation greening was quantified using remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Hydrological partitioning at the catchment scale was estimated with a metric of catchment-scale water fluxes and vegetation water use [Horton index (HI)]. The predominantly north-facing catchment, when compared with the other two eastern catchments, receives less solar radiation, exhibits less forest cover and smaller biomass and has more surface run-off (~15% of P) as a consequence of a smaller vaporization (85% of P) and smaller vegetation water consumption (HI=0·85). Moreover, the north-facing catchment showed smaller peak NDVI values (5·98) and shorter growing season length (121days) as a consequence of energy limitation. In contrast, the two eastern catchments receive larger solar radiation and have more biomass and forest cover (>76%), smaller surface run-off (90% P) and vegetation water consumption (HI=0·95). The eastern catchments had larger vegetation greening (6·28-6·58) and a longer growing season (148-160days). Snowpack conditions, such as maximum snow water equivalent and duration of the snow on the ground, explain over 95% of water partitioning (HI) that in turn influenced annual vegetation greening (R2=0·48-0·67; p

AB - We investigated vegetation structure, water partitioning dynamics and vegetation greening from 2000 through 2012 in three catchments draining north and east aspects of Redondo Peak in northern New Mexico. Vegetation structure was quantified from 1-m lidar data, while vegetation greening was quantified using remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Hydrological partitioning at the catchment scale was estimated with a metric of catchment-scale water fluxes and vegetation water use [Horton index (HI)]. The predominantly north-facing catchment, when compared with the other two eastern catchments, receives less solar radiation, exhibits less forest cover and smaller biomass and has more surface run-off (~15% of P) as a consequence of a smaller vaporization (85% of P) and smaller vegetation water consumption (HI=0·85). Moreover, the north-facing catchment showed smaller peak NDVI values (5·98) and shorter growing season length (121days) as a consequence of energy limitation. In contrast, the two eastern catchments receive larger solar radiation and have more biomass and forest cover (>76%), smaller surface run-off (90% P) and vegetation water consumption (HI=0·95). The eastern catchments had larger vegetation greening (6·28-6·58) and a longer growing season (148-160days). Snowpack conditions, such as maximum snow water equivalent and duration of the snow on the ground, explain over 95% of water partitioning (HI) that in turn influenced annual vegetation greening (R2=0·48-0·67; p

KW - Aspect

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KW - Vegetation structure

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