Influence of worldview on health care choices among persons with chronic pain

Tina Buck, Carol M. Baldwin, Gary E Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this research was to examine relationships between the Pepperian worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. Design: A convenience sample survey was done. Setting: University Medical Center Pain Clinic, Tucson, Arizona. Subjects: Men and women patients (n = 96) with nonmalignant chronic pain. Outcome measures: World Hypothesis Scale; Health Care Choice List. Results: Findings indicate that the combination of age and formistic worldview are statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Older patients and persons with a predominantly formistic worldview were less likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a choice among this sample with chronic nonmalignant pain. Borderline significant associations were noted between persons with formistic or mechanistic worldviews and conventional health care choices, and persons with contextualistic, organismic, or equal scores in two worldview categories and CAM health care choices. Although rates of CAM use did not significantly differ from conventional choices, the prevalence rate for CAM use was high (55.2%) based on national findings. Conclusions: Results of this study provide a link to understanding how underlying philosophies can contribute to the reasons people with chronic pain make health care decisions. Further exploration of worldviews might very well contribute to best practices for consumer health care by engaging in communication styles and belief systems consistent with consumers' personal schemas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-568
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Complementary Therapies
Chronic Pain
Delivery of Health Care
Pain Clinics
Practice Guidelines
Communication
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Influence of worldview on health care choices among persons with chronic pain. / Buck, Tina; Baldwin, Carol M.; Schwartz, Gary E.

In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 561-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{87b7a0ca2fa147caabf98b5832457595,
title = "Influence of worldview on health care choices among persons with chronic pain",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this research was to examine relationships between the Pepperian worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. Design: A convenience sample survey was done. Setting: University Medical Center Pain Clinic, Tucson, Arizona. Subjects: Men and women patients (n = 96) with nonmalignant chronic pain. Outcome measures: World Hypothesis Scale; Health Care Choice List. Results: Findings indicate that the combination of age and formistic worldview are statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Older patients and persons with a predominantly formistic worldview were less likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a choice among this sample with chronic nonmalignant pain. Borderline significant associations were noted between persons with formistic or mechanistic worldviews and conventional health care choices, and persons with contextualistic, organismic, or equal scores in two worldview categories and CAM health care choices. Although rates of CAM use did not significantly differ from conventional choices, the prevalence rate for CAM use was high (55.2{\%}) based on national findings. Conclusions: Results of this study provide a link to understanding how underlying philosophies can contribute to the reasons people with chronic pain make health care decisions. Further exploration of worldviews might very well contribute to best practices for consumer health care by engaging in communication styles and belief systems consistent with consumers' personal schemas.",
author = "Tina Buck and Baldwin, {Carol M.} and Schwartz, {Gary E}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1089/acm.2005.11.561",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "561--568",
journal = "Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine",
issn = "1075-5535",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of worldview on health care choices among persons with chronic pain

AU - Buck, Tina

AU - Baldwin, Carol M.

AU - Schwartz, Gary E

PY - 2005/6

Y1 - 2005/6

N2 - Objective: The aim of this research was to examine relationships between the Pepperian worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. Design: A convenience sample survey was done. Setting: University Medical Center Pain Clinic, Tucson, Arizona. Subjects: Men and women patients (n = 96) with nonmalignant chronic pain. Outcome measures: World Hypothesis Scale; Health Care Choice List. Results: Findings indicate that the combination of age and formistic worldview are statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Older patients and persons with a predominantly formistic worldview were less likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a choice among this sample with chronic nonmalignant pain. Borderline significant associations were noted between persons with formistic or mechanistic worldviews and conventional health care choices, and persons with contextualistic, organismic, or equal scores in two worldview categories and CAM health care choices. Although rates of CAM use did not significantly differ from conventional choices, the prevalence rate for CAM use was high (55.2%) based on national findings. Conclusions: Results of this study provide a link to understanding how underlying philosophies can contribute to the reasons people with chronic pain make health care decisions. Further exploration of worldviews might very well contribute to best practices for consumer health care by engaging in communication styles and belief systems consistent with consumers' personal schemas.

AB - Objective: The aim of this research was to examine relationships between the Pepperian worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. Design: A convenience sample survey was done. Setting: University Medical Center Pain Clinic, Tucson, Arizona. Subjects: Men and women patients (n = 96) with nonmalignant chronic pain. Outcome measures: World Hypothesis Scale; Health Care Choice List. Results: Findings indicate that the combination of age and formistic worldview are statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Older patients and persons with a predominantly formistic worldview were less likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a choice among this sample with chronic nonmalignant pain. Borderline significant associations were noted between persons with formistic or mechanistic worldviews and conventional health care choices, and persons with contextualistic, organismic, or equal scores in two worldview categories and CAM health care choices. Although rates of CAM use did not significantly differ from conventional choices, the prevalence rate for CAM use was high (55.2%) based on national findings. Conclusions: Results of this study provide a link to understanding how underlying philosophies can contribute to the reasons people with chronic pain make health care decisions. Further exploration of worldviews might very well contribute to best practices for consumer health care by engaging in communication styles and belief systems consistent with consumers' personal schemas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=22244446457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=22244446457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/acm.2005.11.561

DO - 10.1089/acm.2005.11.561

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 561

EP - 568

JO - Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

JF - Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

SN - 1075-5535

IS - 3

ER -