Influences of supplemental feeding on winter elk calf: cow ratios in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Aaron M. Foley, Paul C. Cross, David A Christianson, Brandon M. Scurlock, Scott Creel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several elk herds in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem are fed during winter to alleviate interactions with livestock, reduce damage to stored crops, and to manage for high elk numbers. The effects of supplemental feeding on ungulate population dynamics has rarely been examined, despite the fact that supplemental feeding is partially justified as necessary for maintaining or enhancing population growth rates. We used linear regression to assess how the presence of feedgrounds, snowpack, summer rainfall, indices of grizzly bear density and wolves per elk, elk population trend counts, brucellosis seroprevalence, and survey date were correlated with midwinter calf:cow ratios, a metric correlated with population growth, from 1983-2010 from 12 ecologically similar elk herd units (7 fed and 5 unfed) in Wyoming, USA. Our statistical approach allowed for rigorous tests of the hypotheses that supplemental feeding had positive effects on calf:cow ratios and reduced sensitivity of calf:cow ratios to bottom-up limitation relative to top-down limitation from native predators. Calf:cow ratios generally declined across all herd units over the study period and varied widely among units with feedgrounds. We found no evidence that the presence of feedgrounds had positive effects on midwinter calf:cow ratios in Wyoming. Further, fed elk showed stronger correlations with environmental factors, whereas calf:cow ratios for unfed elk showed stronger correlations with predator indices. Although we found no consistent association between winter feeding and higher calf:cow ratios, we did not assess late winter mortality and differences in human offtake between fed and unfed regions, which remain a priority for future research. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)887-897
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Wildlife Management
Volume79
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

elks
dietary supplements
calves
cows
winter
ecosystems
ecosystem
population growth
brucellosis
predator
herds
snowpack
ungulate
livestock
population dynamics
environmental factor
predators
Ursus arctos
mortality
rainfall

Keywords

  • brucellosis
  • calf:cow ratio
  • Canis lupus
  • Cervus elaphus canadensis
  • elk
  • Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (USA)
  • grizzly bear
  • supplemental feeding
  • Ursus arctos
  • Wolf

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Ecology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Influences of supplemental feeding on winter elk calf : cow ratios in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. / Foley, Aaron M.; Cross, Paul C.; Christianson, David A; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Creel, Scott.

In: Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 79, No. 6, 01.08.2015, p. 887-897.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foley, Aaron M. ; Cross, Paul C. ; Christianson, David A ; Scurlock, Brandon M. ; Creel, Scott. / Influences of supplemental feeding on winter elk calf : cow ratios in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. In: Journal of Wildlife Management. 2015 ; Vol. 79, No. 6. pp. 887-897.
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