Informing the elk debate: Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states

C. F. Hutchinson, Stuart Marsh, Barron J Orr, P. Krausman, R. M. Enns, Larry D Howery, E. Pfirman, C. Wallace, J. Walker, K. Mauz, H. Boyd, H. Salazar, E. Trobia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to provide information that might help resource managers understand the distribution of elk in Arizona as a consequence of seasonal variation and in response to extreme climatic events (i.e. El Niño and La Niña). The first task involved modeling elk population over time. A technique for modeling elk population has been developed that is based on harvest data, gender ratios, and estimates of male mortality. This provided estimates of elk populations for individual game management units (areas for which harvest is reported and within which elk are managed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department). The second task involved the use of satellite data to characterize vegetation responses to seasonal and interannual climate variation among vegetation associations within game management units. This involved the use of NOAA-AVHRR time series data to describe temporal vegetation behavior, Landsat data to describe spatial vegetation distribution in conjunction with U.S. Forest Service vegetation maps. Elk population estimates were correlated with satellite-derived vegetation measures by vegetation association through time. The patterns of elk distribution that this revealed were complex. Not surprisingly, animals appear to respond to differences in vegetation availability - both seasonally and interannually - as portrayed by satellite data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS)
Pages834-836
Number of pages3
Volume2
StatePublished - 2001
Event2001 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS 2001) - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: Jul 9 2001Jul 13 2001

Other

Other2001 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS 2001)
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period7/9/017/13/01

Fingerprint

Natural resources management
EOS
NASA
resource management
natural resource
Earth (planet)
vegetation
population modeling
Satellites
satellite data
Advanced very high resolution radiometers (AVHRR)
conflict
climate variation
AVHRR
Fish
Landsat
Time series
gender
Animals
Managers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Geology

Cite this

Hutchinson, C. F., Marsh, S., Orr, B. J., Krausman, P., Enns, R. M., Howery, L. D., ... Trobia, E. (2001). Informing the elk debate: Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states. In International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) (Vol. 2, pp. 834-836)

Informing the elk debate : Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states. / Hutchinson, C. F.; Marsh, Stuart; Orr, Barron J; Krausman, P.; Enns, R. M.; Howery, Larry D; Pfirman, E.; Wallace, C.; Walker, J.; Mauz, K.; Boyd, H.; Salazar, H.; Trobia, E.

International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). Vol. 2 2001. p. 834-836.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hutchinson, CF, Marsh, S, Orr, BJ, Krausman, P, Enns, RM, Howery, LD, Pfirman, E, Wallace, C, Walker, J, Mauz, K, Boyd, H, Salazar, H & Trobia, E 2001, Informing the elk debate: Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states. in International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). vol. 2, pp. 834-836, 2001 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS 2001), Sydney, NSW, Australia, 7/9/01.
Hutchinson CF, Marsh S, Orr BJ, Krausman P, Enns RM, Howery LD et al. Informing the elk debate: Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states. In International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). Vol. 2. 2001. p. 834-836
Hutchinson, C. F. ; Marsh, Stuart ; Orr, Barron J ; Krausman, P. ; Enns, R. M. ; Howery, Larry D ; Pfirman, E. ; Wallace, C. ; Walker, J. ; Mauz, K. ; Boyd, H. ; Salazar, H. ; Trobia, E. / Informing the elk debate : Applying NASA earth observing system (EOS) data to natural resource management conflicts in the western states. International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). Vol. 2 2001. pp. 834-836
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