Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing

Ashley J. Welch, Eric K. Chan, Jennifer K Barton, Bernard Choi, Sharon L. Thomsen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers for skin resurfacing has been described by several authors. The procedure uses 30 microseconds to 1 ms laser pulses with pulse energies from 100 - 600 mJ to ablate skin for the purpose of smoothing skin irregularities: that is, wrinkle removal. The carbon-dioxide laser has been selected because it ablates a limited layer of tissue (approximately 10 micrometer at a radiant exposure of 5 J/cm 2)4 and produce minimal thermal damage. The purpose of this study is to measure the surface temperature created during a resurfacing procedure and discuss the thermal implications of the measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages305-311
Number of pages7
Volume2970
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventLasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems VII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 8 1997Feb 8 1997

Other

OtherLasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems VII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period2/8/972/8/97

Fingerprint

carbon dioxide lasers
CO2 Laser
Infrared Imaging
Infrared imaging
Carbon dioxide lasers
Skin
Carbon Dioxide
Laser
Lasers
Laser pulses
pulses
irregularities
smoothing
surface temperature
lasers
micrometers
Irregularity
damage
Pulsed lasers
Smoothing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Welch, A. J., Chan, E. K., Barton, J. K., Choi, B., & Thomsen, S. L. (1997). Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 2970, pp. 305-311) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.275061

Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing. / Welch, Ashley J.; Chan, Eric K.; Barton, Jennifer K; Choi, Bernard; Thomsen, Sharon L.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2970 1997. p. 305-311.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Welch, AJ, Chan, EK, Barton, JK, Choi, B & Thomsen, SL 1997, Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 2970, pp. 305-311, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems VII, San Jose, CA, United States, 2/8/97. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.275061
Welch AJ, Chan EK, Barton JK, Choi B, Thomsen SL. Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2970. 1997. p. 305-311 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.275061
Welch, Ashley J. ; Chan, Eric K. ; Barton, Jennifer K ; Choi, Bernard ; Thomsen, Sharon L. / Infrared imaging of CO2 laser resurfacing. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2970 1997. pp. 305-311
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