Inhibition of caspases by cytokine response modifier A blocks androgen ablation-mediated prostate cancer cell death in vivo

Sampathkumar Srikanth, Andrew S. Kraft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Androgen withdrawal is a major therapeutic modality in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although tumors initially respond, they subsequently relapse, and these recurring tumors are androgen independent. To examine possible mechanisms to explain the androgen independence of prostate cancer, we have expressed cytokine response modifier A (CrmA), a competitive inhibitor of caspases, interleukin 1β-converting enzyme-like proteases, which mediate apoptotic cell death, in the human androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. LNCaP cells require androgens for continuous growth in culture and to form tumors in nude mice. The expression of CrmA in LNCaP cells prevented the decreased growth rate induced by androgen withdrawal in tissue culture. When CrmA-expressing LNCaP (LNCaP-CrmA) cells were implanted s.c. in nude mice, the tumors grew six times faster than parental cells. Androgen ablation by castration before tumor implantation suppressed the ability of control LNCaP cells expressing nonfunctional CrmA mutant (R291T) to form tumors, but LNCaP-CrmA cells formed tumors similar in size to those formed in normal mice. When orchiectomy was performed 10 days after tumor implantation, control LNCaP cells expressing a nonfunctional CrmA mutant (R291T) regressed, but LNCaP-CrmA tumors continued to grow. Thus, inhibition of caspases prevents androgen withdrawal-induced prostate cancer cell death, suggesting that caspase activation is normally an important part of this process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)834-839
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume58
Issue number4
StatePublished - Feb 15 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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