Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol

M. Pütter, K. H M Grotemeyer, G. Würthwein, M. Araghi-Niknam, Ronald R Watson, S. Hosseini, P. Rohdewald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of a bioflavonoid mixture, Pycnogenol, were assessed on platelet function in humans. Cigarette smoking increased heart rate and blood pressure. These increases were not influenced by oral consumption of Pycnogenol or Aspirin just before smoking. However, increased platelet reactivity yielding aggregation 2 hours after smoking was prevented by 500 mg Aspirin or 100 mg Pycnogenol in 22 German heavy smokers. In a group of 16 American smokers, blood pressure increased after smoking. It was unchanged after intake of 500 mg Aspirin or 125 mg Pycnogenol. In another group of 19 American smokers, increased platelet aggregation was more significantly reduced by 200 than either 150 mg or 100 mg Pycnogenol supplementation. This study showed that a single, high dose, 200 mg Pycnogenol, remained effective for over 6 days against smoking-induced platelet aggregation. Smoking increased platelet aggregation that was prevented after administration of 500 mg Aspirin and 125 mg Pycnogenol. Thus, smoking-induced enhanced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 500 mg Aspirin as well as by a lower range of 100-125 mg Pycnogenol. Aspirin significantly (p<0.001) increased bleeding time from 167 to 236 seconds while Pycnogenol did not. These observations suggest an advantageous risk-benefit ratio for Pycnogenol. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-161
Number of pages7
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 1999

Fingerprint

Platelet Aggregation
Aspirin
Smoking
Blood Platelets
pycnogenols
Inhibition (Psychology)
Blood Pressure
Bleeding Time
Flavonoids
Heart Rate
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Bioflavanoids
  • Bleeding
  • Platelet reactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Hematology

Cite this

Pütter, M., Grotemeyer, K. H. M., Würthwein, G., Araghi-Niknam, M., Watson, R. R., Hosseini, S., & Rohdewald, P. (1999). Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol. Thrombosis Research, 95(4), 155-161. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4

Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol. / Pütter, M.; Grotemeyer, K. H M; Würthwein, G.; Araghi-Niknam, M.; Watson, Ronald R; Hosseini, S.; Rohdewald, P.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 95, No. 4, 15.08.1999, p. 155-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pütter, M, Grotemeyer, KHM, Würthwein, G, Araghi-Niknam, M, Watson, RR, Hosseini, S & Rohdewald, P 1999, 'Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol', Thrombosis Research, vol. 95, no. 4, pp. 155-161. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4
Pütter M, Grotemeyer KHM, Würthwein G, Araghi-Niknam M, Watson RR, Hosseini S et al. Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol. Thrombosis Research. 1999 Aug 15;95(4):155-161. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4
Pütter, M. ; Grotemeyer, K. H M ; Würthwein, G. ; Araghi-Niknam, M. ; Watson, Ronald R ; Hosseini, S. ; Rohdewald, P. / Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol. In: Thrombosis Research. 1999 ; Vol. 95, No. 4. pp. 155-161.
@article{78185be0d6104a468b31b2c75cc80b11,
title = "Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol",
abstract = "The effects of a bioflavonoid mixture, Pycnogenol, were assessed on platelet function in humans. Cigarette smoking increased heart rate and blood pressure. These increases were not influenced by oral consumption of Pycnogenol or Aspirin just before smoking. However, increased platelet reactivity yielding aggregation 2 hours after smoking was prevented by 500 mg Aspirin or 100 mg Pycnogenol in 22 German heavy smokers. In a group of 16 American smokers, blood pressure increased after smoking. It was unchanged after intake of 500 mg Aspirin or 125 mg Pycnogenol. In another group of 19 American smokers, increased platelet aggregation was more significantly reduced by 200 than either 150 mg or 100 mg Pycnogenol supplementation. This study showed that a single, high dose, 200 mg Pycnogenol, remained effective for over 6 days against smoking-induced platelet aggregation. Smoking increased platelet aggregation that was prevented after administration of 500 mg Aspirin and 125 mg Pycnogenol. Thus, smoking-induced enhanced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 500 mg Aspirin as well as by a lower range of 100-125 mg Pycnogenol. Aspirin significantly (p<0.001) increased bleeding time from 167 to 236 seconds while Pycnogenol did not. These observations suggest an advantageous risk-benefit ratio for Pycnogenol. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.",
keywords = "Bioflavanoids, Bleeding, Platelet reactivity",
author = "M. P{\"u}tter and Grotemeyer, {K. H M} and G. W{\"u}rthwein and M. Araghi-Niknam and Watson, {Ronald R} and S. Hosseini and P. Rohdewald",
year = "1999",
month = "8",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "95",
pages = "155--161",
journal = "Thrombosis Research",
issn = "0049-3848",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibition of smoking-induced platelet aggregation by aspirin and pycnogenol

AU - Pütter, M.

AU - Grotemeyer, K. H M

AU - Würthwein, G.

AU - Araghi-Niknam, M.

AU - Watson, Ronald R

AU - Hosseini, S.

AU - Rohdewald, P.

PY - 1999/8/15

Y1 - 1999/8/15

N2 - The effects of a bioflavonoid mixture, Pycnogenol, were assessed on platelet function in humans. Cigarette smoking increased heart rate and blood pressure. These increases were not influenced by oral consumption of Pycnogenol or Aspirin just before smoking. However, increased platelet reactivity yielding aggregation 2 hours after smoking was prevented by 500 mg Aspirin or 100 mg Pycnogenol in 22 German heavy smokers. In a group of 16 American smokers, blood pressure increased after smoking. It was unchanged after intake of 500 mg Aspirin or 125 mg Pycnogenol. In another group of 19 American smokers, increased platelet aggregation was more significantly reduced by 200 than either 150 mg or 100 mg Pycnogenol supplementation. This study showed that a single, high dose, 200 mg Pycnogenol, remained effective for over 6 days against smoking-induced platelet aggregation. Smoking increased platelet aggregation that was prevented after administration of 500 mg Aspirin and 125 mg Pycnogenol. Thus, smoking-induced enhanced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 500 mg Aspirin as well as by a lower range of 100-125 mg Pycnogenol. Aspirin significantly (p<0.001) increased bleeding time from 167 to 236 seconds while Pycnogenol did not. These observations suggest an advantageous risk-benefit ratio for Pycnogenol. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

AB - The effects of a bioflavonoid mixture, Pycnogenol, were assessed on platelet function in humans. Cigarette smoking increased heart rate and blood pressure. These increases were not influenced by oral consumption of Pycnogenol or Aspirin just before smoking. However, increased platelet reactivity yielding aggregation 2 hours after smoking was prevented by 500 mg Aspirin or 100 mg Pycnogenol in 22 German heavy smokers. In a group of 16 American smokers, blood pressure increased after smoking. It was unchanged after intake of 500 mg Aspirin or 125 mg Pycnogenol. In another group of 19 American smokers, increased platelet aggregation was more significantly reduced by 200 than either 150 mg or 100 mg Pycnogenol supplementation. This study showed that a single, high dose, 200 mg Pycnogenol, remained effective for over 6 days against smoking-induced platelet aggregation. Smoking increased platelet aggregation that was prevented after administration of 500 mg Aspirin and 125 mg Pycnogenol. Thus, smoking-induced enhanced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 500 mg Aspirin as well as by a lower range of 100-125 mg Pycnogenol. Aspirin significantly (p<0.001) increased bleeding time from 167 to 236 seconds while Pycnogenol did not. These observations suggest an advantageous risk-benefit ratio for Pycnogenol. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

KW - Bioflavanoids

KW - Bleeding

KW - Platelet reactivity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0042135946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0042135946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4

DO - 10.1016/S0049-3848(99)00030-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 10498385

AN - SCOPUS:0042135946

VL - 95

SP - 155

EP - 161

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

IS - 4

ER -