Inhibition of Staphylococci by vancomycin absorbed on triidodecylmethyl ammonium chloride-coated intravenous catheter

Terry L. Bowersock, Leszlie Woodyard, Allan J Hamilton, John A. DeFord

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Catheter-related infections are a serious problem in hospitalized patients. Triidodecylmethyl ammonium chloride (TDMAC)-treated catheters were absorbed with the antibiotic vancomycin and evaluated for bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis over time. Bactericidal activity occurred in a biphasic pattern with peak activity from 0-72 h and activity detectable for up to 6 days. Incubation of the TDMAC-coated catheters in serum did not reduce the bactericidal activity of vancomycin bound to the catheter for Staphylococci. These results document that TDMAC-coated catheters could be used to absorb vancomycin thereby expanding the range of antibiotics available for binding to surfactant-treated catheters. The use of vancomycin would be helpful in preventing catheter infections by highly antibiotic-resistant organisms such as the Staphylococci, especially in sites such as the brain where effective concentration of other parenterally administered antibiotics is difficult to attain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Ammonium Chloride
Vancomycin
Staphylococcus
Catheters
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Catheter-Related Infections
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Surface-Active Agents
Staphylococcus aureus
Brain
Infection
Serum

Keywords

  • Bacterial infection
  • Bactericidal activity
  • Catheter-related infection
  • Intravenous
  • Staphylococcus
  • Vancomycin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Inhibition of Staphylococci by vancomycin absorbed on triidodecylmethyl ammonium chloride-coated intravenous catheter. / Bowersock, Terry L.; Woodyard, Leszlie; Hamilton, Allan J; DeFord, John A.

In: Journal of Controlled Release, Vol. 31, No. 3, 1994, p. 237-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - DeFord, John A.

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