Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance

David M. Levy, Jacob O. Wobbrock, Alfred W. Kaszniak, Marilyn Ostergren

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

This paper reports initial results from a study exploring whether training in meditation or relaxation can improve office workers' ability to multitask on a computer more effectively and/or with less stress. Human resource (HR) personnel were given 8 weeks of training in either mindfulness meditation or body relaxation techniques, and were given a stressful multitasking test both before and after training. (A third group, a control group, received no intervention during the 8-week period but was tested both before and after this period.) Results indicate that overall task time and errors did not differ significantly among the three groups. However, the meditation group reported lower levels of stress and showed better memory for the tasks they had performed; they also switched tasks less often and remained focused on tasks longer.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Pages2011-2016
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: May 7 2011May 12 2011

Other

Other29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period5/7/115/12/11

Fingerprint

Multitasking
Personnel
Data storage equipment

Keywords

  • Attention training
  • Human attention
  • Information overload
  • Knowledge workers
  • Meditation
  • Multitasking
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Levy, D. M., Wobbrock, J. O., Kaszniak, A. W., & Ostergren, M. (2011). Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 2011-2016). DOI: 10.1145/1979742.1979862

Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance. / Levy, David M.; Wobbrock, Jacob O.; Kaszniak, Alfred W.; Ostergren, Marilyn.

Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. p. 2011-2016.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Levy, DM, Wobbrock, JO, Kaszniak, AW & Ostergren, M 2011, Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance. in Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. pp. 2011-2016, 29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 5/7/11. DOI: 10.1145/1979742.1979862
Levy DM, Wobbrock JO, Kaszniak AW, Ostergren M. Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. p. 2011-2016. Available from, DOI: 10.1145/1979742.1979862
Levy, David M. ; Wobbrock, Jacob O. ; Kaszniak, Alfred W. ; Ostergren, Marilyn. / Initial results from a study of the effects of meditation on multitasking performance. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. pp. 2011-2016
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