Inland saline aquaculture

Geoff L. Allan, D. Stewart Fielder, Kevin Fitzsimmons, Samuel L. Applebaum, Sudhir Raizada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing demand for aquaculture has led to the development of new production systems. Inland saline aquaculture, defined here as land-based aquaculture using saline groundwater, occurs in several countries including Israel, the USA, India and Australia. A number of species are cultured, or are being evaluated for their potential, including finfish such as tilapia, Asian sea bass and trout, shrimp and oysters. Sources of saline groundwater include ephemeral and permanent saline lakes, saline water extracted with coal seam gas and saline groundwater extracted from aquifers. Saline groundwater is extracted in some areas to protect the root zone of plants. Characteristics of saline-affected land are described, with particular focus on Australia and India. Another emerging source of saline groundwater is the coal bed methane gas industry. Saline water accompanies extraction of the gas and, while it can be a major environmental problem for the gas industry, it presents an opportunity for aquaculture. Saline groundwater can differ in chemistry compared with coastal seawater and adjusting the chemistry or choosing species that are tolerant to the differences is one of the major challenges for expansion of inland saline aquaculture. The chemistry of different sources of water is described and common methods of adjusting the chemistry described. Finally, case studies of inland saline aquaculture are presented for Australia, India, Israel and the USA. Novel food production methods, such as inland saline aquaculture, are needed to increase aquaculture production and meet increasing demands for seafood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNew Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages1119-1147
Number of pages29
ISBN (Print)9781845693848
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Aquaculture
Groundwater
aquaculture
groundwater
chemistry
Gases
India
Coal
Gas industry
gases
Israel
saline water
Industry
industry
Tilapia
Bass
Lates calcarifer
Ostreidae
Seafood
novel foods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Allan, G. L., Fielder, D. S., Fitzsimmons, K., Applebaum, S. L., & Raizada, S. (2009). Inland saline aquaculture. In New Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management (pp. 1119-1147). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1533/9781845696474.6.1119

Inland saline aquaculture. / Allan, Geoff L.; Fielder, D. Stewart; Fitzsimmons, Kevin; Applebaum, Samuel L.; Raizada, Sudhir.

New Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management. Elsevier Inc., 2009. p. 1119-1147.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Allan, GL, Fielder, DS, Fitzsimmons, K, Applebaum, SL & Raizada, S 2009, Inland saline aquaculture. in New Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management. Elsevier Inc., pp. 1119-1147. https://doi.org/10.1533/9781845696474.6.1119
Allan GL, Fielder DS, Fitzsimmons K, Applebaum SL, Raizada S. Inland saline aquaculture. In New Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management. Elsevier Inc. 2009. p. 1119-1147 https://doi.org/10.1533/9781845696474.6.1119
Allan, Geoff L. ; Fielder, D. Stewart ; Fitzsimmons, Kevin ; Applebaum, Samuel L. ; Raizada, Sudhir. / Inland saline aquaculture. New Technologies in Aquaculture: Improving Production Efficiency, Quality and Environmental Management. Elsevier Inc., 2009. pp. 1119-1147
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