Insect resistance to Bt crops: Evidence versus theory

Bruce E Tabashnik, Aaron J. Gassmann, David W. Crowder, Yves Carriere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

471 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evolution of insect resistance threatens the continued success of transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that kill pests. The approach used most widely to delay insect resistance to Bt crops is the refuge strategy, which requires refuges of host plants without Bt toxins near Bt crops to promote survival of susceptible pests. However, large-scale tests of the refuge strategy have been problematic. Analysis of more than a decade of global monitoring data reveals that the frequency of resistance alleles has increased substantially in some field populations of Helicoverpa zea, but not in five other major pests in Australia, China, Spain and the United States. The resistance of H. zea to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in transgenic cotton has not caused widespread crop failures, in part because other tactics augment control of this pest. The field outcomes documented with monitoring data are consistent with the theory underlying the refuge strategy, suggesting that refuges have helped to delay resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-202
Number of pages4
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Bacillus thuringiensis
Bacilli
Crops
Insects
Zea mays
Pest Control
Monitoring
Gene Frequency
Spain
Cotton
China
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Insect resistance to Bt crops : Evidence versus theory. / Tabashnik, Bruce E; Gassmann, Aaron J.; Crowder, David W.; Carriere, Yves.

In: Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 26, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 199-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tabashnik, Bruce E ; Gassmann, Aaron J. ; Crowder, David W. ; Carriere, Yves. / Insect resistance to Bt crops : Evidence versus theory. In: Nature Biotechnology. 2008 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 199-202.
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