Inspiratory muscle strength training lowers blood pressure and sympathetic activity in older adults with OSA: A randomized controlled pilot trial

Guadalupe Elizabeth Ramos-Barrera, Claire M. DeLucia, E. Fiona Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ramos-Barrera GE, DeLucia CM, Bailey EF. Inspiratory muscle strength training lowers blood pressure and sympathetic activity in older adults with OSA: a randomized controlled pilot trial. J Appl Physiol 129: 449–458, 2020. First published July 30, 2020; doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00024.2020.—Previous work has shown lowered casual blood pressure after just 6 wk of inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST), suggesting IMST as a potential therapeutic in the prevention/treatment of hypertension. In this study, we assessed the effects of IMST on cardiovascular parameters in older, overweight adults diagnosed with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two interventions 1) high-intensity IMST (n = 15, 75% maximal inspiratory pressure), or 2) a control intervention (n = 10, 15% maximum inspiratory pressure). Subjects in both groups trained at home completing 30 training breaths/day, 5 days/wk for 6 wk. Pre- and posttraining measures included maximal inspiratory pressure, casual and ambulatory blood pressures, spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Men and women in the high-intensity IMST group exhibited reductions in casual systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), and mean arterial blood pressures (MAP) [SBP: - 8.82 ± 4.98 mmHg; DBP: - 4.69 ± 2.81 mmHg; and MAP: - 6.06 ± 1.03 mmHg; P < 0.002] and nighttime SBP (pre: -12.00 ± 8.20 mmHg; P < 0.01). Muscle sympathetic nerve activities also were lower (- 6.97 ± 2.29 bursts/min-1; P = 0.01 and - 9.55 ± 2.42 bursts/100 heartbeats; P = 0.002) by week 6. Conversely, subjects allocated to the control group showed no change in casual blood pressure or muscle sympathetic nerve activity and a trend toward higher overnight blood pressures. A short course of high-intensity IMST may offer significant respiratory and cardiovascular benefits for older, overweight adults with OSA. For Clinical Trial Registration, see https://www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT02709941). NEW & NOTEWORTHY Older, obese adults with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea who perform 5 min/day high-intensity inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) exhibit lowered casual and nighttime systolic blood pressure and sympathetic nervous outflow. In contrast, adults assigned to a control (low-intensity) intervention exhibit no change in casual blood pressure or muscle sympathetic nerve activity and a trend toward increased overnight blood pressure. Remarkably, adherence to IMST even among sleep-deprived and exercise-intolerant adults is high (96%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-458
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume129
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Respiratory training
  • Sympathetic activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Inspiratory muscle strength training lowers blood pressure and sympathetic activity in older adults with OSA: A randomized controlled pilot trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this