Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype

Ji Nyeong Choi, Dongok Ryu, Sug Whan Kim, Logan Graves, Peng Su, Run Huang, Dae Wook Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of the newest testing methods for large mirror surfaces. The Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) technique can be applicable to the SCOTS simulation by performing non-sequential ray tracing from the screen to the camera detector in the real scale. Therefore, the radiometry of distorted pattern images are numerically estimated by the IRT simulation module. In this study, we construct an IRT SCOTS simulation model for the Fast Steering Mirror Prototype (FSMP) surface of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMT FSMP is an off-axis ellipsoidal concave mirror that is 1064 mm in diameter and has PV 3.1 mm in aspheric departure. The surface error requirement is less than 20 nm rms. The screen is modeled as an array of 1366 by 768 screen pixels of 0.227 mm in pitch size. The screen is considered as a Lambertian scattering surface. The screen and the camera are positioned around 4390 mm away from the mirror and separated by around 132 mm from each other. The light source are scanning lines and sinusoidal patterns generated by 616,050 rays per one screen pixel. Of the initially generated rays, 0.22 % are received by the camera's detector and contribute to form distorted pattern images. These images are converted to the slope and height maps of the mirror surface. The final result for the height difference between input surface and reconstructed surface was 14.14 nm rms. Additionally, the simulated mirror pattern image was compared with the real SCOTS test for the GMT FSMP. This study shows applicability of using the IRT model to SCOTS simulation with nanometer level numerical accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSPIE
Volume9575
ISBN (Print)9781628417418
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
EventOptical Manufacturing and Testing XI - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 9 2015Aug 11 2015

Other

OtherOptical Manufacturing and Testing XI
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/9/158/11/15

Fingerprint

Optical testing
Optical Testing
Surface measurement
Ray Tracing
Ray tracing
ray tracing
Telescopes
Telescope
Mirror
Mirrors
prototypes
telescopes
Prototype
mirrors
computer programs
Software
systems simulation
Simulation
System Simulation
simulation

Keywords

  • Deflectometry
  • Integrated Ray Tracing
  • Optical Testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Choi, J. N., Ryu, D., Kim, S. W., Graves, L., Su, P., Huang, R., & Kim, D. W. (2015). Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 9575). [957513] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2188845

Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype. / Choi, Ji Nyeong; Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug Whan; Graves, Logan; Su, Peng; Huang, Run; Kim, Dae Wook.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9575 SPIE, 2015. 957513.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Choi, JN, Ryu, D, Kim, SW, Graves, L, Su, P, Huang, R & Kim, DW 2015, Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 9575, 957513, SPIE, Optical Manufacturing and Testing XI, San Diego, United States, 8/9/15. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2188845
Choi JN, Ryu D, Kim SW, Graves L, Su P, Huang R et al. Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9575. SPIE. 2015. 957513 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2188845
Choi, Ji Nyeong ; Ryu, Dongok ; Kim, Sug Whan ; Graves, Logan ; Su, Peng ; Huang, Run ; Kim, Dae Wook. / Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9575 SPIE, 2015.
@inproceedings{8c126f1ef006482f83586aa4d64af62b,
title = "Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype",
abstract = "The Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of the newest testing methods for large mirror surfaces. The Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) technique can be applicable to the SCOTS simulation by performing non-sequential ray tracing from the screen to the camera detector in the real scale. Therefore, the radiometry of distorted pattern images are numerically estimated by the IRT simulation module. In this study, we construct an IRT SCOTS simulation model for the Fast Steering Mirror Prototype (FSMP) surface of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMT FSMP is an off-axis ellipsoidal concave mirror that is 1064 mm in diameter and has PV 3.1 mm in aspheric departure. The surface error requirement is less than 20 nm rms. The screen is modeled as an array of 1366 by 768 screen pixels of 0.227 mm in pitch size. The screen is considered as a Lambertian scattering surface. The screen and the camera are positioned around 4390 mm away from the mirror and separated by around 132 mm from each other. The light source are scanning lines and sinusoidal patterns generated by 616,050 rays per one screen pixel. Of the initially generated rays, 0.22 {\%} are received by the camera's detector and contribute to form distorted pattern images. These images are converted to the slope and height maps of the mirror surface. The final result for the height difference between input surface and reconstructed surface was 14.14 nm rms. Additionally, the simulated mirror pattern image was compared with the real SCOTS test for the GMT FSMP. This study shows applicability of using the IRT model to SCOTS simulation with nanometer level numerical accuracy.",
keywords = "Deflectometry, Integrated Ray Tracing, Optical Testing",
author = "Choi, {Ji Nyeong} and Dongok Ryu and Kim, {Sug Whan} and Logan Graves and Peng Su and Run Huang and Kim, {Dae Wook}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1117/12.2188845",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781628417418",
volume = "9575",
booktitle = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
publisher = "SPIE",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS surface measurement of GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype

AU - Choi, Ji Nyeong

AU - Ryu, Dongok

AU - Kim, Sug Whan

AU - Graves, Logan

AU - Su, Peng

AU - Huang, Run

AU - Kim, Dae Wook

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of the newest testing methods for large mirror surfaces. The Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) technique can be applicable to the SCOTS simulation by performing non-sequential ray tracing from the screen to the camera detector in the real scale. Therefore, the radiometry of distorted pattern images are numerically estimated by the IRT simulation module. In this study, we construct an IRT SCOTS simulation model for the Fast Steering Mirror Prototype (FSMP) surface of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMT FSMP is an off-axis ellipsoidal concave mirror that is 1064 mm in diameter and has PV 3.1 mm in aspheric departure. The surface error requirement is less than 20 nm rms. The screen is modeled as an array of 1366 by 768 screen pixels of 0.227 mm in pitch size. The screen is considered as a Lambertian scattering surface. The screen and the camera are positioned around 4390 mm away from the mirror and separated by around 132 mm from each other. The light source are scanning lines and sinusoidal patterns generated by 616,050 rays per one screen pixel. Of the initially generated rays, 0.22 % are received by the camera's detector and contribute to form distorted pattern images. These images are converted to the slope and height maps of the mirror surface. The final result for the height difference between input surface and reconstructed surface was 14.14 nm rms. Additionally, the simulated mirror pattern image was compared with the real SCOTS test for the GMT FSMP. This study shows applicability of using the IRT model to SCOTS simulation with nanometer level numerical accuracy.

AB - The Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of the newest testing methods for large mirror surfaces. The Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) technique can be applicable to the SCOTS simulation by performing non-sequential ray tracing from the screen to the camera detector in the real scale. Therefore, the radiometry of distorted pattern images are numerically estimated by the IRT simulation module. In this study, we construct an IRT SCOTS simulation model for the Fast Steering Mirror Prototype (FSMP) surface of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMT FSMP is an off-axis ellipsoidal concave mirror that is 1064 mm in diameter and has PV 3.1 mm in aspheric departure. The surface error requirement is less than 20 nm rms. The screen is modeled as an array of 1366 by 768 screen pixels of 0.227 mm in pitch size. The screen is considered as a Lambertian scattering surface. The screen and the camera are positioned around 4390 mm away from the mirror and separated by around 132 mm from each other. The light source are scanning lines and sinusoidal patterns generated by 616,050 rays per one screen pixel. Of the initially generated rays, 0.22 % are received by the camera's detector and contribute to form distorted pattern images. These images are converted to the slope and height maps of the mirror surface. The final result for the height difference between input surface and reconstructed surface was 14.14 nm rms. Additionally, the simulated mirror pattern image was compared with the real SCOTS test for the GMT FSMP. This study shows applicability of using the IRT model to SCOTS simulation with nanometer level numerical accuracy.

KW - Deflectometry

KW - Integrated Ray Tracing

KW - Optical Testing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84951081816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84951081816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.2188845

DO - 10.1117/12.2188845

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84951081816

SN - 9781628417418

VL - 9575

BT - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

PB - SPIE

ER -