Integrating quantitative and quantitative methods to model infant feeding behavior among Navajo mothers

Mark C. Bauer, Anne L. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antropologists have long discussed the value and limitations of various methods of describing and understanding behavior. This article demonstrates that utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods can improve our understanding of complex behaviors. Ethographic interviews were used to create a decision tree model of the choice of breastfeeding or formula feeding for Navajo women. This preliminary model was tested with reference to the initial feeding decisions of 250 post-partum women. Errors in the model and statistical analysis of correlates of feeding behavior were used to improve the decision model, which was subsequently tested on a new sample of 52 mothers. The final model accurately predicted the initial infant feeding behavior of 96% of women in the new sample. This combination of techniques proved useful in developing a breastfeeding promotion program which targeted specific groups for education and addressed local concerns and perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalHuman organization
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Decision models
  • Infant feeding
  • Methods
  • Native Americans; US

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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