Integrative medicine in residency: Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program

Patricia Lebensohn, Benjamin Kligler, Audrey J. Brooks, Raymond Teets, Michele Birch, Paula Cook, Victoria Maizes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Online curricular interventions in residency have been proposed to address challenges of time, cost, and curriculum consistency. This study is designed to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a longitudinal, multisite online curriculum in integrative medicine (IMR) for residents. METHODS: Residents from eight family medicine programs undertook the 200-hour online IMR curriculum. Their medical knowledge (MK) scores at completion were compared to a control group from four similar residency programs. Study and control groups were comparable in baseline demographics, and MK scores. Course completion, MK scores, and course evaluations were assessed. RESULTS: Of 186 IMR residents, 76.9% met completion requirements. The IMR group showed statistically significant higher MK scores at residency completion, the control group did not (IMR: 79.2% vs. Control: 53.2% mean correct). Over three-fourths of IMR participants (range 79-92%) chose the top two rating categories for each course evaluation item. In an exit survey, ability to access the curriculum for 1 additional year and intention to utilize IM approaches after residency were the highest ranked items. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstrated feasibility, effectiveness, and positive evaluations of the IMR curriculum indicate that a multisite, online curricular intervention is a potentially viable approach to offering new curriculum with limited on-site faculty expertise for other family medicine residencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-521
Number of pages8
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume49
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Integrative Medicine
Program Evaluation
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Control Groups
Medicine
Aptitude
Demography
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Lebensohn, P., Kligler, B., Brooks, A. J., Teets, R., Birch, M., Cook, P., & Maizes, V. (2017). Integrative medicine in residency: Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program. Family Medicine, 49(7), 514-521.

Integrative medicine in residency : Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program. / Lebensohn, Patricia; Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J.; Teets, Raymond; Birch, Michele; Cook, Paula; Maizes, Victoria.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 514-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lebensohn, P, Kligler, B, Brooks, AJ, Teets, R, Birch, M, Cook, P & Maizes, V 2017, 'Integrative medicine in residency: Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program', Family Medicine, vol. 49, no. 7, pp. 514-521.
Lebensohn P, Kligler B, Brooks AJ, Teets R, Birch M, Cook P et al. Integrative medicine in residency: Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program. Family Medicine. 2017 Jul 1;49(7):514-521.
Lebensohn, Patricia ; Kligler, Benjamin ; Brooks, Audrey J. ; Teets, Raymond ; Birch, Michele ; Cook, Paula ; Maizes, Victoria. / Integrative medicine in residency : Feasibility and effectiveness of an online program. In: Family Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 7. pp. 514-521.
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