Interactive versus stand-alone group decision support systems for stakeholder identification and assumption surfacing in small groups

Annette C. Easton, Douglas R. Vogel, Jay F. Nunamaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

As we begin to see evidence that Group Decision Support Systems can be beneficial, it becomes increasingly important to investigate the effect of different GDSS designs on decision making processes. This study investigated the effect of a GDSS based on the Strategic Assumption Surfacing and Testing model for strategic planning impact analysis. A controlled laboratory experiment compared the results of 4-person groups that had either Stand-Alone GDSS support (one personal computer per group) or Interactive GDSS support (4 networked personal computers per group). Measures were taken on decision outcomes (quality, time and satisfaction with the outcomes) and decision process variables (quantity of unique alternatives, distribution of individual participation, and satisfaction with the process). We found that the interactive GDSS groups generated a higher number of unique ideas and had more even participation rates. However they were less satisfied with both the process and the outcomes. We also found no significant difference between the groups in terms of decision quality and decision time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-168
Number of pages10
JournalDecision Support Systems
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1992

Keywords

  • Computer supported collaborative work
  • Computer supported groups
  • Computer supported work
  • Group decision support systems
  • Group process and outcomes
  • Strategic planning.
  • stakeholder analysis. Computer supported meetings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Information Systems
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Information Systems and Management

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Interactive versus stand-alone group decision support systems for stakeholder identification and assumption surfacing in small groups'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this