Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits

David W. Dunham, Robert W. Farquhar, Sergey Aksenov, Yulia Fedorenko, Roberto Furfaro, John Kidd

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

International collaboration will be necessary for a viable program of exploration beyond the Moon, similar to that for the ISS, and reusable spacecraft will also be needed. High-energy Earth orbits that can be drastically modified with lunar swingbys and small propulsive maneuvers are used, especially near the collinear Sun-Earth and Earth-Moon libration points. The first human missions beyond low-Earth orbit may go to the vicinity of the translunar Earth-Moon libration point. This paper will concentrate on the next possible step, the first one into interplanetary space, that could be a one-year return mission to fly by a Near-Earth Object (NEO). Details are presented of a trajectory that leaves a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point, then uses three lunar swingbys and relatively small propulsive maneuvers to fly by the asteroid 1994 XL1, and return to the Earth-Moon L2 halo orbit for a ΔV of only 432 m/s. Next, rendezvous missions to some other NEO's will be presented. Finally, trajectories to reach Mars, first to Phobos or Deimos, will be outlined. The study uses highly-elliptical Earth orbits (HEOs) whose line of apsides can be rotated using lunar swingbys. The HEO provides a convenient and relatively fast location for rendezvous with crew, or to add propulsion or cargo modules, a technique that we call "Phasing Orbit Rendezvous".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc.
ISBN (Print)9781624103087
StatePublished - 2014
EventAIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 4 2014Aug 7 2014

Other

OtherAIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/4/148/7/14

Fingerprint

libration
moon
Orbits
rendezvous
Earth (planet)
Earth orbits
orbits
Moon
near Earth objects
elliptical orbits
maneuvers
reusable spacecraft
apsides
halos
Deimos
trajectories
Phobos
interplanetary space
cargo
crews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Dunham, D. W., Farquhar, R. W., Aksenov, S., Fedorenko, Y., Furfaro, R., & Kidd, J. (2014). Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits. In AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc..

Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits. / Dunham, David W.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Aksenov, Sergey; Fedorenko, Yulia; Furfaro, Roberto; Kidd, John.

AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dunham, DW, Farquhar, RW, Aksenov, S, Fedorenko, Y, Furfaro, R & Kidd, J 2014, Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits. in AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014, San Diego, CA, United States, 8/4/14.
Dunham DW, Farquhar RW, Aksenov S, Fedorenko Y, Furfaro R, Kidd J. Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits. In AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. 2014
Dunham, David W. ; Farquhar, Robert W. ; Aksenov, Sergey ; Fedorenko, Yulia ; Furfaro, Roberto ; Kidd, John. / Interplanetary human exploration enabled by lunar swingbys and libration-point orbits. AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference 2014. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., 2014.
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