Intonational convergence in language contact: Utterance-final F0 contours in Catalan-Spanish early bilinguals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates utterance-final pitch accents in declaratives in two contact languages (Catalan and Spanish) as produced by two groups of Catalan-Spanish bilinguals (Catalan-dominant and Spanish-dominant). It contributes to a growing body of research showing that bilinguals transfer the intonational patterns of their native language to their non-native language, and it provides a sociolinguistic profile of an intonational variable in a language contact situation. We also examine the interaction of native and non-native patterns within the performance of the bilinguals. Evidence is presented for the existence of a process of phonetic category assimilation of non-native pitch contrasts to native pitch contours, as well as for phonetic new-category formation in second language learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-184
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of the International Phonetic Association
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Language
contact
language
Phonetics
phonetics
Sodium Glutamate
sociolinguistics
assimilation
Utterance
Languages in Contact
Learning
interaction
Research
learning
performance
evidence
Group
Pitch Contour
Interaction
Contact Languages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Anthropology

Cite this

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