Intra-tree foraging behavior of Ceratitis capitata flies in relation to host fruit density and quality

Ronald J. Prokopy, Daniel R Papaj, Susan B. Opp, Tim T Y Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the intra-tree foraging behavior of individually-released, wild-population Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), on field-caged host trees bearing each of three different densities (0, 3, or 12 per tree) of non-infested host fruit (kumquat) or each of two levels of fruit quality (12 non-infested fruit or 12 fruit infested with eggs and covered with host marking pheromone). With increasing density of non-infested fruit, medflies tended to remain longer in trees, visit more fruit before leaving, oviposit more often, accept a proportionately smaller number of fruit visited, and emigrate sooner after the last egg was laid (i.e. have a shorter Giving-Up-Time). Medflies spent much less time, oviposited much less often, and exhibited a longer Giving-Up-Time on trees harboring pheromone-marked fruit than non-infested fruit. Variation in temperature within the range at which experiments were conducted (25-36°C) had little detectable influence on foraging behavior. We compare our findings with published findings on the intra-tree foraging behavior of another tephritid fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), and with current foraging behavior theory. We discuss implications of our findings with respect to medfly management strategies, particularly fruit stripping in eradication programs and use of synthetic marking pheromone for control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalEntomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Ceratitis capitata
foraging behavior
fruit
foraging
fruits
pheromones
pheromone
Rhagoletis pomonella
egg
fruit quality
wild population

Keywords

  • Ceratitis capitata
  • foraging behavior
  • oviposition
  • Tephritidae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Intra-tree foraging behavior of Ceratitis capitata flies in relation to host fruit density and quality. / Prokopy, Ronald J.; Papaj, Daniel R; Opp, Susan B.; Wong, Tim T Y.

In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, Vol. 45, No. 3, 12.1987, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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