Introduction of a fresh cadaver laboratory during the surgery clerkship improves emergency technical skills

Saman Nematollahi, Stephen J. Kaplan, Christopher M. Knapp, Hang Ho, Jared Alvarado, Rebecca Viscusi, William Adamas-Rappaport

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Student acquisition of technical skills during the clinical years of medical school has been steadily declining. To address this issue, the authors instituted a fresh cadaver-based Emergency Surgical Skills Laboratory (ESSL). Methods Sixty-three medical students rotating through the third-year surgery clerkship participated in a 2-hour, fresh cadaver-based ESSL conducted during the first 2 days of the clerkship. The authors evaluated students utilizing both surgical skills and written examination before the ESSL and at 4 weeks post ESSL. Results Students demonstrated a mean improvement of 64% (±11) (P <.001) and 38% (±17) (P <.001) in technical skills and clinical knowledge, respectively. When technical skills were compared between cohorts, there were no differences observed in both pre- and post-testing (P =.08). Conclusions A fresh cadaver laboratory is an effective method to provide proficiency in emergency technical skills not acquired during the clinical years of medical school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-403.e2
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume210
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Keywords

  • Medical student education
  • Surgery clerkship
  • Surgical education
  • Surgical skills
  • Unpreserved cadaver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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