Is emergency department cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation safe and effective?

Brian G. Cohn, Samuel M Keim, Donald M. Yealy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common dysrhythmia presenting to Emergency Departments (EDs). Controversy exists regarding the optimal clinical therapy for these patients, which typically focuses on rhythm rate-control and admission or cardioversion and discharge home. Clinical Question: Is ED cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation safe, effective, and does it result in positive meaningful patient outcomes? Evidence Review: Five observation studies with nearly 1600 ED patients with atrial fibrillation treated with either rate-control or cardioversion were reviewed and results compiled. Results: Overall, ED cardioversion for recent-onset AF seems safe and effective, with success rates ranging from 85.5% to 97% in these studies. Although further research should seek to identify patients at low risk for thromboembolic complication, more rigorously assess patient satisfaction, and show cost savings, emergency physicians should feel comfortable using this approach in select patients. Conclusion: ED cardioversion for recent-onset AF seems safe and effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-127
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Electric Countershock
Atrial Fibrillation
Hospital Emergency Service
Cost Savings
Patient Satisfaction
Emergencies
Observation
Physicians
Research

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Cardioversion
  • Effectiveness
  • Emergency Department
  • Recent onset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Is emergency department cardioversion of recent-onset atrial fibrillation safe and effective? / Cohn, Brian G.; Keim, Samuel M; Yealy, Donald M.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 1, 2013, p. 117-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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