Is organizational justice the new industrial relations? A debate on individual versus collective underpinnings of justice

Stephen W. Gilliland, Michael A. Gross, Raymond L. Hogler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study is based on a debate about the nature of two intellectual domains, industrial relations (IR) and organizational behavior (OB). Ray Hogler (Colorado State University) argues that the distinguishing feature of IR is its collectivist approach to work and organizations. As OB came to dominate the academic landscape, the research landscape shifted to a microanalytical focus. In consequence, business schools have failed to engage with the social problem of inequality of wealth. Early figures in American economic development, such as John D. Rockefeller, Jr., offered a more expansive vision of firms and labor than the current intellectual climate driven by an agency theory of management aimed at short-term profit. In his response, Stephen Gilliland (University of Arizona) asserts that the individualistic orientation of organizational justice provides a much more strategic and aligned approach to employee-employer relations. Unions provide a broad brush approach grounded in adversarial relationships and unfairness. By satisfying individual interests of fair treatment, leading through organizational justice provides benefits for employees, organizations, and their stakeholders. Fair treatment of employees has a ripple effect that impacts customer treatment and satisfaction. Whether the organization's strategy is based on value, customer service, or innovation, organizational justice can be aligned with strategic goals for the benefit of all.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-172
Number of pages18
JournalNegotiation and Conflict Management Research
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Conflict
  • Economic inequality
  • Industrial relations
  • Organizational justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Strategy and Management

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