Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: model evaluations and sensitivity analyses

A. B. Guenther, P. R. Zimmerman, P. C. Harley, Russell Monson, R. Fall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1072 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The temperature dependence of monoterpene emission varies among monoterpenes, plant species, and other factors, but a simple exponential relationship between emission rate (E) and leaf temperature (T), E = Es [exp (β(T - Ts))], provides a good approximation. A review of reported measurements suggests a best estimate of β = 0.09 K-1 for all plants and monoterpenes. Isoprene emissions increase with photosynthetically active radiation up to a saturation point at 700-900 μmol m-2 s-1. An exponential increase in isoprene emission is observed at leaf temperatures of less than 30°C. Emissions continue to increase with higher temperatures until a maximum emission rate is reached at about 40°C, after which emissions rapidly decline. This temperature dependence can be described by an enzyme activation equation that includes denaturation at high temperature. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume98
Issue numberD7
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Monoterpenes
monoterpene
isoprene
evaluation
sensitivity
Temperature
leaves
temperature
photosynthetically active radiation
Denaturation
temperature dependence
biopolymer denaturation
rate
Chemical activation
enzymes
Radiation
activation
saturation
enzyme
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability : model evaluations and sensitivity analyses. / Guenther, A. B.; Zimmerman, P. R.; Harley, P. C.; Monson, Russell; Fall, R.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, Vol. 98, No. D7, 1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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