Job characteristics and satisfaction of pharmacy technicians.

L. M. Cortese, D. W. Greenberger, Philip J Schneider, J. A. Bourret

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perceptions of job characteristics and job satisfaction of central-area technicians and drug-administration technicians at The Ohio State University Hospitals were analyzed. A questionnaire was administered to 79 pharmacy drug-administration technicians; 44 central-area technicians; 10 pharmacy residents, who served as objective raters (5 in the central area and 5 in the decentral area); 13 central-area pharmacists; and 17 decentral-area pharmacists. Perceived job characteristics were measured with the Job Characteristics Inventory; job satisfaction was measured by the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire. The two groups of technicians differed significantly in their perceptions of task identity, task significance, and dealing with others. Significantly greater autonomy in technicians' jobs was perceived to exist by pharmacists and raters in both areas than by technicians. Significantly greater task identity was perceived by the central-area technicians than by their raters, and significantly greater task importance was perceived by both groups of technicians than by their pharmacists and raters. Friendship opportunities were perceived to exist to a significantly greater degree by decentral pharmacists and raters than by the drug-administration technicians. In the institution studied, both central-area and drug-administration technicians tended to be dissatisfied with their jobs. Central-area technicians' satisfaction was influenced most by the technicians' relationships with their supervisors and the feelings of accomplishment they gained. Drug-administration technicians were most satisfied if they believed they had opportunities to use their abilities. Efforts to increase job satisfaction among pharmacy technicians should focus on increasing feedback and task identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2514-2518
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospital Pharmacy
Volume44
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Job Satisfaction
Pharmacists
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacy Administration
State Hospitals
Aptitude
Emotions
Pharmacy Technicians
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Cortese, L. M., Greenberger, D. W., Schneider, P. J., & Bourret, J. A. (1987). Job characteristics and satisfaction of pharmacy technicians. American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 44(11), 2514-2518.

Job characteristics and satisfaction of pharmacy technicians. / Cortese, L. M.; Greenberger, D. W.; Schneider, Philip J; Bourret, J. A.

In: American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, Vol. 44, No. 11, 11.1987, p. 2514-2518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cortese, LM, Greenberger, DW, Schneider, PJ & Bourret, JA 1987, 'Job characteristics and satisfaction of pharmacy technicians.', American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, vol. 44, no. 11, pp. 2514-2518.
Cortese, L. M. ; Greenberger, D. W. ; Schneider, Philip J ; Bourret, J. A. / Job characteristics and satisfaction of pharmacy technicians. In: American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy. 1987 ; Vol. 44, No. 11. pp. 2514-2518.
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