Just add water and the Colorado river still reaches the sea

Edward P. Glenn, Karl Flessa, Michael J. Cohen, Pamela L. Nagler, Kirsten Rowell, Francisco Zamora-Arroyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recent article in Environmental Management by All argued that flood flows in North America's Colorado River do not reach the Gulf of California because they are captured and evaporated in Laguna Salada, a below sea-level lakebed near the mouth of the river. We refute this hypothesis by showing that (1) due to its limited area, the Laguna Salada could have evaporated less than 10% of the flood flows that have occurred since 1989; (2) low flow volumes preferentially flow to the Gulf rather than Laguna Salada; (3) All's method for detecting water surface area in the Laguna Salada appears to be flawed because Landsat Thematic Mapper images of the lakebed show it to be dry when All's analyses said it was flooded; (4) direct measurements of salinity at the mouth of the river and in the Upper Gulf of California during flood flows in 1993 and 1998 confirm that flood waters reach the sea; and (5) stable oxygen isotope signatures in clam shells and fish otoliths recorded the dilution of seawater with fresh water during the 1993 and 1998 flows. Furthermore, All's conclusion that freshwater flows do not benefit the ecology of the marine zone is incorrect because the peer-reviewed literature shows that postlarval larval shrimp populations increase during floods, and the subsequent year's shrimp harvest increases. Furthermore, freshwater flows increase the nursery area for Gulf corvina (Cynoscion othonopterus), an important commercial fish that requires estuarine habitats with salinities in the range of 26-38‰ during its natal stages. Although flood flows are now much diminished compared to the pre-dam era, they are still important to the remnant wetland and riparian habitats of the Colorado River delta and to organisms in the intertidal and marine zone. Only a small fraction of the flood flows are evaporated in Laguna Salada.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Rivers
Water
river
water
Fish
Oxygen Isotopes
Environmental management
Sea level
Wetlands
Ecology
sea
salinity
Seawater
Dams
Dilution
Isotopes
habitat
fish
otolith
Landsat thematic mapper

Keywords

  • Colorado River estuary
  • Gulf of California
  • Laguna Salada
  • Tidal mixing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Glenn, E. P., Flessa, K., Cohen, M. J., Nagler, P. L., Rowell, K., & Zamora-Arroyo, F. (2007). Just add water and the Colorado river still reaches the sea. Environmental Management, 40(1), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-006-0070-8

Just add water and the Colorado river still reaches the sea. / Glenn, Edward P.; Flessa, Karl; Cohen, Michael J.; Nagler, Pamela L.; Rowell, Kirsten; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 40, No. 1, 07.2007, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glenn, EP, Flessa, K, Cohen, MJ, Nagler, PL, Rowell, K & Zamora-Arroyo, F 2007, 'Just add water and the Colorado river still reaches the sea', Environmental Management, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-006-0070-8
Glenn, Edward P. ; Flessa, Karl ; Cohen, Michael J. ; Nagler, Pamela L. ; Rowell, Kirsten ; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco. / Just add water and the Colorado river still reaches the sea. In: Environmental Management. 2007 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
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