Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region

Robert G Varady, Roberto Salmón Castelo, Susanna - Eden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The region transected by the international border separating Mexico and the United States is one of the world’s most distinctive transboundary zones. Running more than 3,100 kilometers from the Pacific to the Atlantic Oceans, it is the world’s tenth longest frontier (see Fig. 1 [map]). But more significantly, the U.S.-Mexico border separates two countries with widely disparate wealth. The ratio of gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of nearly five to one, though it has been diminishing over the past decade, remains among the world’s 20 or so highest, ranking alongside Germany-Poland, Chile-Bolivia, and Russia-North Korea. Of relevance for our present program, Israel’s borders with its neighbors exhibit similar, though even wider gulfs in wealth. Israel’s ratios with Jordan, Syria, Egypt, and Palestine are 8.1, 10.5, 13.8, and 20.1 - this last, the world’s highest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationShared Borders, Shared Waters
Subtitle of host publicationIsraeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges
PublisherCRC Press
Pages35-50
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780203597682
ISBN (Print)9780415662635
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

border region
Water resources
Mexico
water resource
water
North Korea
gross domestic product
Syria
Bolivia
Palestine
Jordan
resources
Egypt
Chile
Poland
ranking
Russia
present
Gross Domestic Product
world

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Varady, R. G., Castelo, R. S., & Eden, S. . (2012). Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region. In Shared Borders, Shared Waters: Israeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges (pp. 35-50). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b13076

Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region. / Varady, Robert G; Castelo, Roberto Salmón; Eden, Susanna -.

Shared Borders, Shared Waters: Israeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges. CRC Press, 2012. p. 35-50.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Varady, RG, Castelo, RS & Eden, S 2012, Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region. in Shared Borders, Shared Waters: Israeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges. CRC Press, pp. 35-50. https://doi.org/10.1201/b13076
Varady RG, Castelo RS, Eden S. Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region. In Shared Borders, Shared Waters: Israeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges. CRC Press. 2012. p. 35-50 https://doi.org/10.1201/b13076
Varady, Robert G ; Castelo, Roberto Salmón ; Eden, Susanna -. / Key issues, institutions, and strategies for managing transboundary water resources in the Arizona-Mexico border region. Shared Borders, Shared Waters: Israeli-Palestinian and Colorado River Basin Water Challenges. CRC Press, 2012. pp. 35-50
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