Kinetics and mechanism of reductive dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride using zero-valence metals

Kara D. Warren, Robert G Arnold, Tammie L. Bishop, Larson C. Lindholm, Eric Betterton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elemental iron and zinc reduced part-per-thousand levels of aqueous-phase carbon tetrachloride to chloroform in a few hours. Free metal ions, chloride ion and hydrogen gas were produced in the reaction; protons were consumed. Process kinetics were dependent on solution pH, surface area of the elemental metal, carbon tetrachloride concentration, buffer selection and solvent composition (volume fraction 2-propanol). Reaction rate was first-order with respect to carbon tetrachloride at concentrations less than 7.5 mM. This class of reactions offers promise as a means for initiating the destruction of heavily halogenated organic compounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-227
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume41
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Dehalogenation
Carbon tetrachloride
Carbon Tetrachloride
Metals
kinetics
Kinetics
Protons
metal
carbon
2-Propanol
Hydrochloric Acid
ion
Propanol
Chloroform
Chlorine compounds
chloroform
Organic compounds
reaction rate
Reaction rates
Metal ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Chemical Health and Safety
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Kinetics and mechanism of reductive dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride using zero-valence metals. / Warren, Kara D.; Arnold, Robert G; Bishop, Tammie L.; Lindholm, Larson C.; Betterton, Eric.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 41, No. 2-3, 1995, p. 217-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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