Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding infant feeding among HIV-infected pregnant women in Gaborone, Botswana

A cross-sectional survey

Justina Ndubuka, Nnamdi Ndubuka, Ying Li, Caitlin M. Marshall, John E Ehiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding infant feeding among HIV-positive pregnant women in Gaborone, Botswana, and factors that influence their infant feeding choices. Design: A cross-sectional study. Methods and study setting: A questionnaire survey of 96 HIV-positive pregnant women attending four public infectious disease control clinics in Gaborone, Botswana. Results: Only about half of the study participants had knowledge about prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services related to breastfeeding, and very few (19.8%) chose to breastfeed their infants exclusively. Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that receiving infant feeding counselling as part of the PMTCT programme was significantly associated with a decision to exclusively breastfeed (OR (95% CI) 5.38 (1.83 to 15.81)). Similarly, HIV-positive pregnant women who received breastfeeding counselling through the PMTCT programme had higher knowledge of PMTCT practices related to appropriate infant feeding (OR (95% CI) 5.91 (1.06 to 34.31)). Women who did not express concern about HIV stigma had significantly higher knowledge of PMTCT practices related to infant feeding (OR (95% CI) 5.91 (1.69 to 15.56)). Knowledge of PMTCT practices related to breastfeeding was negatively associated with the belief that breastfeeding could transmit HIV to the baby (OR (95% CI) 9.73 (3.37 to 28.08)). Conclusions: Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to breastfeeding among HIV-positive pregnant women need further improvement, and the PMTCT programme should strengthen infant feeding counselling services to assist HIV-positive mothers in making informed and appropriate decisions regarding infant feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere003749
JournalBMJ Open
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Botswana
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Pregnant Women
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mothers
HIV
Breast Feeding
Counseling
Communicable Diseases
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding infant feeding among HIV-infected pregnant women in Gaborone, Botswana : A cross-sectional survey. / Ndubuka, Justina; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Li, Ying; Marshall, Caitlin M.; Ehiri, John E.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 3, No. 11, e003749, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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