Knowledge of and attitudes toward mountain lions: A public survey of residents adjacent to saguaro national park, arizona

Anne L. Casey, Paul R. Krausman, William W Shaw, H. G. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

If humans and mountain lions(Puma concolor)are to coexist, managers need to understand how both use an area and understand the local public’s view toward large predators. In spring 2000, the authors conducted a telephone survey of 9 local wildlife managers and a mail survey to assess 493 suburban residents’ knowledge of and attitudes toward mountain lions near Tucson, Arizona. All agencies wanted more information that could lead to improved management of mountain lions. The overall response to the public survey was 52% (493 /[1, 000-52]). Respondents’ knowledge of mountain lion biology was low (M= 2.5 ± 0.07 [SE] out of 7.0). Respondents supported management measures that protect mountain lions in all landscapes and opposed measures that removed protections. There is local support of mountain lion conservation, and it is recommended that educational opportunities be created for the local public so residents are informed about mountain lion research and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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national park
mountain
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Keywords

  • Mountain lions
  • Public attitudes
  • Puma concolor
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Knowledge of and attitudes toward mountain lions : A public survey of residents adjacent to saguaro national park, arizona. / Casey, Anne L.; Krausman, Paul R.; Shaw, William W; Shaw, H. G.

In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2005, p. 29-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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