Knowledge sharing and knowledge management system avoidance: The role of knowledge type and the social network in bypassing an organizational knowledge management system

Susan A Brown, Alan R. Dennis, Diana Burley, Priscilla Arling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge sharing is a difficult task for most organizations, and there are many reasons for this. In this article, we propose that the nature of the knowledge shared and an individual's social network influence employees to find more value in person-to-person knowledge sharing, which could lead them to bypass the codified knowledge provided by a knowledge management system (KMS). We surveyed employees of a workman's compensation board in Canada and used social network analysis and hierarchical linear modeling to analyze the data. The results show that knowledge complexity and knowledge teachability increased the likelihood of finding value in person-to-person knowledge transfer, but knowledge observability did not. Contrary to expectations, whether the knowledge was available in the KMS had no impact on the value of person-to-person knowledge transfer. In terms of the social network, individuals with larger networks tended to perceive more value in the person-to-person transfer of knowledge than those with smaller networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2013-2023
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
Volume64
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

Fingerprint

Knowledge management
knowledge management
social network
Personnel
human being
Observability
Electric network analysis
knowledge
knowledge transfer
Values
employee
Knowledge management systems
Social networks
Knowledge sharing
Avoidance
Knowledge types
Organizational knowledge
network analysis
Knowledge transfer
Canada

Keywords

  • knowledge
  • knowledge management
  • social networking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Information Systems
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

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