Lab-on-a-chip immunoassay for multiple antibodies using microsphere light scattering and quantum dot emission

Lonnie J. Lucas, Jennine N. Chesler, Jeong-Yeol Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Double detection of microsphere light scattering and quantum dot emission was demonstrated for lab-on-a-chip immunoassay without using stationary support. We conjugated quantum dots (QDs) onto microspheres to enable multiplex assays as well as to enhance the limit of detection (LOD). We named this configuration "nano-on-micro" or "NOM". Upon radiation with UV light (380 nm), a stronger light scattering signal is observed with NOMs than QDs or microspheres alone. Additionally, NOMs are easier to handle than QDs. Since QDs also provide fluorescent emission, we are able to utilize an increase in light scattering for detecting antigen-antibody reaction and a decrease in QD emission to identify which antibody (or antigen) is present. Two types of NOM combinations were used. One batch of microspheres was coated with QDs emitting at 655 nm and mouse IgG (mIgG); the other with QDs emitting at 605 nm and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A mixture of these two NOMs was used to identify either anti-mIgG or anti-BSA. NOM particles and target solutions were mixed in a microfluidic device (using highly carboxylated microspheres as previously demonstrated by our group) and on-chip detection was performed using proximity optical fibers. Forward light scattering at 380 nm was collected. With the positive target, the scattering signal was increased. The LOD was as low as 50 ng ml-1 (330 pM) with p < 0.05. Fluorescent emission (655 or 605 nm) was simultaneously collected. With the positive target, the emission signal was attenuated. Therefore, we were able to detect two different antibodies simultaneously with two different detection protocols. We believe this NOM bioassay has the ability to screen for and detect multiple antibodies with minimal sample processing and handling (one-step lab-on-a-chip immunoassay).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2007

Fingerprint

Quantum Dots
Lab-on-a-chip
Microspheres
Immunoassay
Antibodies
Light scattering
Semiconductor quantum dots
Light
Lab-On-A-Chip Devices
Bovine Serum Albumin
Limit of Detection
Immunoglobulin G
Antigen-antibody reactions
Antigen-Antibody Reactions
Optical Fibers
Forward scattering
Bioassay
Ultraviolet Rays
Antigens
Microfluidics

Keywords

  • Immunoagglutination
  • Microfluidic device
  • Multiplex assay
  • On-chip detection
  • Quantum dots
  • Static light scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Lab-on-a-chip immunoassay for multiple antibodies using microsphere light scattering and quantum dot emission. / Lucas, Lonnie J.; Chesler, Jennine N.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol.

In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 23, No. 5, 15.12.2007, p. 675-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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