Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control

EGS Collab Team

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

It is possible to engineer and control the extents of the stimulation rock volume for hydraulic fracturing. Currently, available tools and methods intended to accomplish this task focus on optimizing injection fluid properties, utilizing existing rock stress boundaries, controlling stimulation intervals in the injection well, and manipulating injection pressures and rates. What if it were possible to control hydraulic fracture extents more directly than these methods do and to have confirmation of these extents in the subsurface? For this, we propose a ‘fracture caging’ concept where an array of injection wells and production wells are drilled prior to stimulation as a means to identify and control the extent of a stimulated zone. Positive identification of stimulation extents occurs by monitoring production well pressures and flow rates. Control of fracture extents occurs by control of the production well pressures and arrangement of production wells so as to contain an intended stimulated zone. In this study, we present the fracture caging concept and validate it with laboratory experiments. Numerical modelling with LLNL’s GEOS code is used to predict the effectiveness of the fracture caging concept as it applies to the SIGMA-V (EGS Collab) geothermal energy research field site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2018Jun 20 2018

Other

Other52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period6/17/186/20/18

Fingerprint

hydraulics
Hydraulics
stimulation
well
Well pressure
injection
Rocks
hydraulic control
Geothermal energy
Hydraulic fracturing
fluid injection
rocks
geothermal energy
fracturing
EOS
rock
engineers
Flow rate
hydraulic fracturing
laboratory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

EGS Collab Team (2018). Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.

Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control. / EGS Collab Team.

2018. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

EGS Collab Team 2018, 'Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control' Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States, 6/17/18 - 6/20/18, .
EGS Collab Team. Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control. 2018. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.
EGS Collab Team. / Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.
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title = "Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control",
abstract = "It is possible to engineer and control the extents of the stimulation rock volume for hydraulic fracturing. Currently, available tools and methods intended to accomplish this task focus on optimizing injection fluid properties, utilizing existing rock stress boundaries, controlling stimulation intervals in the injection well, and manipulating injection pressures and rates. What if it were possible to control hydraulic fracture extents more directly than these methods do and to have confirmation of these extents in the subsurface? For this, we propose a ‘fracture caging’ concept where an array of injection wells and production wells are drilled prior to stimulation as a means to identify and control the extent of a stimulated zone. Positive identification of stimulation extents occurs by monitoring production well pressures and flow rates. Control of fracture extents occurs by control of the production well pressures and arrangement of production wells so as to contain an intended stimulated zone. In this study, we present the fracture caging concept and validate it with laboratory experiments. Numerical modelling with LLNL’s GEOS code is used to predict the effectiveness of the fracture caging concept as it applies to the SIGMA-V (EGS Collab) geothermal energy research field site.",
author = "{EGS Collab Team} and Frash, {L. P.} and K. Arora and Y. Gan and M. Lu and M. Gutierrez and P. Fu and J. Morris and J. Hampton and J. Ajo-Franklin and Bauer, {S. J.} and T. Baumgartner and K. Beckers and D. Blankenship and A. Bonneville and L. Boyd and Brown, {S. T.} and Burghardt, {J. A.} and T. Chen and Y. Chen and K. Condon and Cook, {P. J.} and Dobson, {P. F.} and T. Doe and Doughty, {C. A.} and D. Elsworth and J. Feldman and A. Foris and Frash, {L. P.} and Z. Frone and P. Fu and K. Gao and A. Ghassemi and H. Gudmundsdottir and Y. Guglielmi and G. Guthrie and B. Haimson and A. Hawkins and J. Heise and Herrick, {C. G.} and M. Horn and Horne, {R. N.} and J. Horner and M. Hu and H. Huang and L. Huang and K. Im and M. Ingraham and Johnson, {T. C.} and B. Johnston and Kwangmin Kim",
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T1 - Laboratory validation of fracture caging for hydraulic fracture control

AU - EGS Collab Team

AU - Frash, L. P.

AU - Arora, K.

AU - Gan, Y.

AU - Lu, M.

AU - Gutierrez, M.

AU - Fu, P.

AU - Morris, J.

AU - Hampton, J.

AU - Ajo-Franklin, J.

AU - Bauer, S. J.

AU - Baumgartner, T.

AU - Beckers, K.

AU - Blankenship, D.

AU - Bonneville, A.

AU - Boyd, L.

AU - Brown, S. T.

AU - Burghardt, J. A.

AU - Chen, T.

AU - Chen, Y.

AU - Condon, K.

AU - Cook, P. J.

AU - Dobson, P. F.

AU - Doe, T.

AU - Doughty, C. A.

AU - Elsworth, D.

AU - Feldman, J.

AU - Foris, A.

AU - Frash, L. P.

AU - Frone, Z.

AU - Fu, P.

AU - Gao, K.

AU - Ghassemi, A.

AU - Gudmundsdottir, H.

AU - Guglielmi, Y.

AU - Guthrie, G.

AU - Haimson, B.

AU - Hawkins, A.

AU - Heise, J.

AU - Herrick, C. G.

AU - Horn, M.

AU - Horne, R. N.

AU - Horner, J.

AU - Hu, M.

AU - Huang, H.

AU - Huang, L.

AU - Im, K.

AU - Ingraham, M.

AU - Johnson, T. C.

AU - Johnston, B.

AU - Kim, Kwangmin

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - It is possible to engineer and control the extents of the stimulation rock volume for hydraulic fracturing. Currently, available tools and methods intended to accomplish this task focus on optimizing injection fluid properties, utilizing existing rock stress boundaries, controlling stimulation intervals in the injection well, and manipulating injection pressures and rates. What if it were possible to control hydraulic fracture extents more directly than these methods do and to have confirmation of these extents in the subsurface? For this, we propose a ‘fracture caging’ concept where an array of injection wells and production wells are drilled prior to stimulation as a means to identify and control the extent of a stimulated zone. Positive identification of stimulation extents occurs by monitoring production well pressures and flow rates. Control of fracture extents occurs by control of the production well pressures and arrangement of production wells so as to contain an intended stimulated zone. In this study, we present the fracture caging concept and validate it with laboratory experiments. Numerical modelling with LLNL’s GEOS code is used to predict the effectiveness of the fracture caging concept as it applies to the SIGMA-V (EGS Collab) geothermal energy research field site.

AB - It is possible to engineer and control the extents of the stimulation rock volume for hydraulic fracturing. Currently, available tools and methods intended to accomplish this task focus on optimizing injection fluid properties, utilizing existing rock stress boundaries, controlling stimulation intervals in the injection well, and manipulating injection pressures and rates. What if it were possible to control hydraulic fracture extents more directly than these methods do and to have confirmation of these extents in the subsurface? For this, we propose a ‘fracture caging’ concept where an array of injection wells and production wells are drilled prior to stimulation as a means to identify and control the extent of a stimulated zone. Positive identification of stimulation extents occurs by monitoring production well pressures and flow rates. Control of fracture extents occurs by control of the production well pressures and arrangement of production wells so as to contain an intended stimulated zone. In this study, we present the fracture caging concept and validate it with laboratory experiments. Numerical modelling with LLNL’s GEOS code is used to predict the effectiveness of the fracture caging concept as it applies to the SIGMA-V (EGS Collab) geothermal energy research field site.

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M3 - Paper

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