Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock

Peter M Rhee, D. Burris, C. Kaufmann, M. Pikoulis, B. Austin, G. Ling, D. Harviel, K. Waxman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

180 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the degree of neutrophil activation caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Methods: Awake swine underwent 15- minute 40% blood volume hemorrhage, and a 1-hour shock period, followed by resuscitation with: group I, lactated Ringer's solution (LR); group II, shed blood; and group III, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HTS). Group IV underwent sham hemorrhage and LR infusion. Neutrophil activation was measured in whole blood using flow cytometry to detect intracellular superoxide burst activity. Results: Neutrophil activation increased significantly immediately after hemorrhage, but it was greatest after resuscitation with LR (group 1, 273 vs. 102%; p < 0.05). Animals that received shed blood (group II) and HTS (group III) had neutrophil activity return to baseline state after resuscitation. Group IV animals had an increase in neutrophil activation (259 vs. 129%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Neutrophil activation occurring after LR resuscitation and LR infusion without hemorrhage, but not after resuscitation with shed blood or HTS, suggests that the neutrophil activation may be caused by LR and not by reperfusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-319
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neutrophil Activation
Hemorrhagic Shock
Resuscitation
Hemorrhage
Blood Group Antigens
Blood Volume
Superoxides
Reperfusion
Ringer's lactate
Ringer's solution
Shock
Flow Cytometry
Neutrophils
Swine

Keywords

  • Activation
  • Flow cytometry
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hypertonic saline
  • Lactated Ringer's solution
  • Neutrophils
  • Resuscitation
  • Shock
  • Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock. / Rhee, Peter M; Burris, D.; Kaufmann, C.; Pikoulis, M.; Austin, B.; Ling, G.; Harviel, D.; Waxman, K.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 44, No. 2, 02.1998, p. 313-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhee, PM, Burris, D, Kaufmann, C, Pikoulis, M, Austin, B, Ling, G, Harviel, D & Waxman, K 1998, 'Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock', Journal of Trauma, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 313-319. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005373-199802000-00014
Rhee, Peter M ; Burris, D. ; Kaufmann, C. ; Pikoulis, M. ; Austin, B. ; Ling, G. ; Harviel, D. ; Waxman, K. / Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock. In: Journal of Trauma. 1998 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 313-319.
@article{c0d4c3710369452081042d79afb49632,
title = "Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine the degree of neutrophil activation caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Methods: Awake swine underwent 15- minute 40{\%} blood volume hemorrhage, and a 1-hour shock period, followed by resuscitation with: group I, lactated Ringer's solution (LR); group II, shed blood; and group III, 7.5{\%} hypertonic saline (HTS). Group IV underwent sham hemorrhage and LR infusion. Neutrophil activation was measured in whole blood using flow cytometry to detect intracellular superoxide burst activity. Results: Neutrophil activation increased significantly immediately after hemorrhage, but it was greatest after resuscitation with LR (group 1, 273 vs. 102{\%}; p < 0.05). Animals that received shed blood (group II) and HTS (group III) had neutrophil activity return to baseline state after resuscitation. Group IV animals had an increase in neutrophil activation (259 vs. 129{\%}; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Neutrophil activation occurring after LR resuscitation and LR infusion without hemorrhage, but not after resuscitation with shed blood or HTS, suggests that the neutrophil activation may be caused by LR and not by reperfusion.",
keywords = "Activation, Flow cytometry, Hemorrhage, Hypertonic saline, Lactated Ringer's solution, Neutrophils, Resuscitation, Shock, Swine",
author = "Rhee, {Peter M} and D. Burris and C. Kaufmann and M. Pikoulis and B. Austin and G. Ling and D. Harviel and K. Waxman",
year = "1998",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1097/00005373-199802000-00014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "313--319",
journal = "Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery",
issn = "2163-0755",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lactated Ringer's solution resuscitation causes neutrophil activation after hemorrhagic shock

AU - Rhee, Peter M

AU - Burris, D.

AU - Kaufmann, C.

AU - Pikoulis, M.

AU - Austin, B.

AU - Ling, G.

AU - Harviel, D.

AU - Waxman, K.

PY - 1998/2

Y1 - 1998/2

N2 - Purpose: To determine the degree of neutrophil activation caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Methods: Awake swine underwent 15- minute 40% blood volume hemorrhage, and a 1-hour shock period, followed by resuscitation with: group I, lactated Ringer's solution (LR); group II, shed blood; and group III, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HTS). Group IV underwent sham hemorrhage and LR infusion. Neutrophil activation was measured in whole blood using flow cytometry to detect intracellular superoxide burst activity. Results: Neutrophil activation increased significantly immediately after hemorrhage, but it was greatest after resuscitation with LR (group 1, 273 vs. 102%; p < 0.05). Animals that received shed blood (group II) and HTS (group III) had neutrophil activity return to baseline state after resuscitation. Group IV animals had an increase in neutrophil activation (259 vs. 129%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Neutrophil activation occurring after LR resuscitation and LR infusion without hemorrhage, but not after resuscitation with shed blood or HTS, suggests that the neutrophil activation may be caused by LR and not by reperfusion.

AB - Purpose: To determine the degree of neutrophil activation caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Methods: Awake swine underwent 15- minute 40% blood volume hemorrhage, and a 1-hour shock period, followed by resuscitation with: group I, lactated Ringer's solution (LR); group II, shed blood; and group III, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HTS). Group IV underwent sham hemorrhage and LR infusion. Neutrophil activation was measured in whole blood using flow cytometry to detect intracellular superoxide burst activity. Results: Neutrophil activation increased significantly immediately after hemorrhage, but it was greatest after resuscitation with LR (group 1, 273 vs. 102%; p < 0.05). Animals that received shed blood (group II) and HTS (group III) had neutrophil activity return to baseline state after resuscitation. Group IV animals had an increase in neutrophil activation (259 vs. 129%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Neutrophil activation occurring after LR resuscitation and LR infusion without hemorrhage, but not after resuscitation with shed blood or HTS, suggests that the neutrophil activation may be caused by LR and not by reperfusion.

KW - Activation

KW - Flow cytometry

KW - Hemorrhage

KW - Hypertonic saline

KW - Lactated Ringer's solution

KW - Neutrophils

KW - Resuscitation

KW - Shock

KW - Swine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031915360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031915360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00005373-199802000-00014

DO - 10.1097/00005373-199802000-00014

M3 - Article

C2 - 9498503

AN - SCOPUS:0031915360

VL - 44

SP - 313

EP - 319

JO - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

JF - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

SN - 2163-0755

IS - 2

ER -