Language as a natural object - Linguistics as a natural science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Chomskyan revolution in linguistics in the 1950s in essence turned linguistics into a branch of cognitive science (and ultimately biology) by both changing the linguistic landscape and forcing a radical change in cognitive science to accommodate linguistics as many of us conceive of it today. More recently Chomsky has advanced the boldest version of his naturalistic approach to language by proposing a Minimalist Program for linguistic theory. In this article, we wish to examine the foundations of the Minimalist Program and its antecedents and draw parallelisms with (meta-)methodological foundations in better-developed sciences such as physics. Once established, such parallelisms, we argue, help direct inquiry in linguistics and cognitive science/biology and unify both disciplines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-466
Number of pages20
JournalLinguistic Review
Volume22
Issue number2-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2005
Externally publishedYes

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natural sciences
linguistics
language
science
biology
physics
Natural Science
Language
Cognitive Science
Parallelism
Noam Chomsky
Minimalist Program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Language as a natural object - Linguistics as a natural science. / Boeckx, Cedric; Piattelli-Palmarini, Massi.

In: Linguistic Review, Vol. 22, No. 2-4, 12.12.2005, p. 447-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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