Large-image-format computed tomography imaging spectrometer for fluorescence microscopy

Bridget K. Ford, Michael R. Descour, Ron Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multispectral imaging has significantly enhanced the analysis of fixed specimens in pathology and cytogenetics. However, application of this technology to in vivo studies has been limited. This is due in part to the increased temporal resolution required to analyze changes in cellular function. Here we present a non-scanning instrument that simultaneously acquires full spectral information (460 nm to 740 nm) from every pixel within its 2-D field of view (200 μm × 200 μm) during a single integration time (typically, 2 seconds). The current spatial and spectral sampling intervals of the spectrometer are 0.985 μm and 5 nm, respectively. These properties allow for the analysis of physiological responses within living biological specimens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-453
Number of pages10
JournalOptics Express
Volume9
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

imaging spectrometers
format
tomography
physiological responses
microscopy
fluorescence
pathology
temporal resolution
field of view
pixels
sampling
spectrometers
intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Large-image-format computed tomography imaging spectrometer for fluorescence microscopy. / Ford, Bridget K.; Descour, Michael R.; Lynch, Ron.

In: Optics Express, Vol. 9, No. 9, 2001, p. 444-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ford, Bridget K. ; Descour, Michael R. ; Lynch, Ron. / Large-image-format computed tomography imaging spectrometer for fluorescence microscopy. In: Optics Express. 2001 ; Vol. 9, No. 9. pp. 444-453.
@article{065495491dfa4f7c9eb3944f36047582,
title = "Large-image-format computed tomography imaging spectrometer for fluorescence microscopy",
abstract = "Multispectral imaging has significantly enhanced the analysis of fixed specimens in pathology and cytogenetics. However, application of this technology to in vivo studies has been limited. This is due in part to the increased temporal resolution required to analyze changes in cellular function. Here we present a non-scanning instrument that simultaneously acquires full spectral information (460 nm to 740 nm) from every pixel within its 2-D field of view (200 μm × 200 μm) during a single integration time (typically, 2 seconds). The current spatial and spectral sampling intervals of the spectrometer are 0.985 μm and 5 nm, respectively. These properties allow for the analysis of physiological responses within living biological specimens.",
author = "Ford, {Bridget K.} and Descour, {Michael R.} and Ron Lynch",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "444--453",
journal = "Optics Express",
issn = "1094-4087",
publisher = "The Optical Society",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Large-image-format computed tomography imaging spectrometer for fluorescence microscopy

AU - Ford, Bridget K.

AU - Descour, Michael R.

AU - Lynch, Ron

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Multispectral imaging has significantly enhanced the analysis of fixed specimens in pathology and cytogenetics. However, application of this technology to in vivo studies has been limited. This is due in part to the increased temporal resolution required to analyze changes in cellular function. Here we present a non-scanning instrument that simultaneously acquires full spectral information (460 nm to 740 nm) from every pixel within its 2-D field of view (200 μm × 200 μm) during a single integration time (typically, 2 seconds). The current spatial and spectral sampling intervals of the spectrometer are 0.985 μm and 5 nm, respectively. These properties allow for the analysis of physiological responses within living biological specimens.

AB - Multispectral imaging has significantly enhanced the analysis of fixed specimens in pathology and cytogenetics. However, application of this technology to in vivo studies has been limited. This is due in part to the increased temporal resolution required to analyze changes in cellular function. Here we present a non-scanning instrument that simultaneously acquires full spectral information (460 nm to 740 nm) from every pixel within its 2-D field of view (200 μm × 200 μm) during a single integration time (typically, 2 seconds). The current spatial and spectral sampling intervals of the spectrometer are 0.985 μm and 5 nm, respectively. These properties allow for the analysis of physiological responses within living biological specimens.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0012972302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0012972302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 444

EP - 453

JO - Optics Express

JF - Optics Express

SN - 1094-4087

IS - 9

ER -