Latino parent acculturation stress: Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health

Elma I. Lorenzo-Blanco, Alan Meca, Jennifer B. Unger, Andrea J Romero, Melinda Gonzales-Backen, Brandy Piña-Watson, Miguel Ángel Cano, Byron L. Zamboanga, Sabrina E Des Rosiers, Daniel W. Soto, Juan A. Villamar, Karina M. Lizzi, Monica Pattarroyo, Seth J. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Latino parents can experience acculturation stressors, and according to the Family Stress Model (FSM), parent stress can influence youth mental health and substance use by negatively affecting family functioning. To understand how acculturation stressors come together and unfold over time to influence youth mental health and substance use outcomes, the current study investigated the trajectory of a latent parent acculturation stress factor and its influence on youth mental health and substance use via parent-and youth-reported family functioning. Data came from a 6-wave, school-based survey with 302 recent (<5 years) immigrant Latino parents (74% mothers, Mage = 41.09 years) and their adolescents (47% female, Mage = 14.51 years). Parents' reports of discrimination, negative context of reception, and acculturative stress loaded onto a latent factor of acculturation stress at each of the first 4 time points. Earlier levels of and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted worse youth-reported family functioning. Additionally, earlier levels of parent acculturation stress predicted worse parent-reported family functioning and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted better parent-reported family functioning. While youth-reported positive family functioning predicted higher self-esteem, lower symptoms of depression, and lower aggressive and rule-breaking behavior in youth, parent-reported family positive functioning predicted lower youth alcohol and cigarette use. Findings highlight the need for Latino youth preventive interventions to target parent acculturation stress and family functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)966-976
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Health
Mental Health
Parents
Self Concept
Tobacco Products
Alcohols
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression

Keywords

  • Acculturation stress
  • Latino families
  • Substance use
  • Youth mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Lorenzo-Blanco, E. I., Meca, A., Unger, J. B., Romero, A. J., Gonzales-Backen, M., Piña-Watson, B., ... Schwartz, S. J. (2016). Latino parent acculturation stress: Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health. Journal of Family Psychology, 30(8), 966-976. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000223

Latino parent acculturation stress : Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health. / Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Meca, Alan; Unger, Jennifer B.; Romero, Andrea J; Gonzales-Backen, Melinda; Piña-Watson, Brandy; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Rosiers, Sabrina E Des; Soto, Daniel W.; Villamar, Juan A.; Lizzi, Karina M.; Pattarroyo, Monica; Schwartz, Seth J.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.12.2016, p. 966-976.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lorenzo-Blanco, EI, Meca, A, Unger, JB, Romero, AJ, Gonzales-Backen, M, Piña-Watson, B, Cano, MÁ, Zamboanga, BL, Rosiers, SED, Soto, DW, Villamar, JA, Lizzi, KM, Pattarroyo, M & Schwartz, SJ 2016, 'Latino parent acculturation stress: Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health', Journal of Family Psychology, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 966-976. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000223
Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I. ; Meca, Alan ; Unger, Jennifer B. ; Romero, Andrea J ; Gonzales-Backen, Melinda ; Piña-Watson, Brandy ; Cano, Miguel Ángel ; Zamboanga, Byron L. ; Rosiers, Sabrina E Des ; Soto, Daniel W. ; Villamar, Juan A. ; Lizzi, Karina M. ; Pattarroyo, Monica ; Schwartz, Seth J. / Latino parent acculturation stress : Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 8. pp. 966-976.
@article{77e2ecef15a64a6bafc96e4378378e13,
title = "Latino parent acculturation stress: Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health",
abstract = "Latino parents can experience acculturation stressors, and according to the Family Stress Model (FSM), parent stress can influence youth mental health and substance use by negatively affecting family functioning. To understand how acculturation stressors come together and unfold over time to influence youth mental health and substance use outcomes, the current study investigated the trajectory of a latent parent acculturation stress factor and its influence on youth mental health and substance use via parent-and youth-reported family functioning. Data came from a 6-wave, school-based survey with 302 recent (<5 years) immigrant Latino parents (74{\%} mothers, Mage = 41.09 years) and their adolescents (47{\%} female, Mage = 14.51 years). Parents' reports of discrimination, negative context of reception, and acculturative stress loaded onto a latent factor of acculturation stress at each of the first 4 time points. Earlier levels of and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted worse youth-reported family functioning. Additionally, earlier levels of parent acculturation stress predicted worse parent-reported family functioning and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted better parent-reported family functioning. While youth-reported positive family functioning predicted higher self-esteem, lower symptoms of depression, and lower aggressive and rule-breaking behavior in youth, parent-reported family positive functioning predicted lower youth alcohol and cigarette use. Findings highlight the need for Latino youth preventive interventions to target parent acculturation stress and family functioning.",
keywords = "Acculturation stress, Latino families, Substance use, Youth mental health",
author = "Lorenzo-Blanco, {Elma I.} and Alan Meca and Unger, {Jennifer B.} and Romero, {Andrea J} and Melinda Gonzales-Backen and Brandy Pi{\~n}a-Watson and Cano, {Miguel {\'A}ngel} and Zamboanga, {Byron L.} and Rosiers, {Sabrina E Des} and Soto, {Daniel W.} and Villamar, {Juan A.} and Lizzi, {Karina M.} and Monica Pattarroyo and Schwartz, {Seth J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/fam0000223",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "966--976",
journal = "Journal of Family Psychology",
issn = "0893-3200",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Latino parent acculturation stress

T2 - Longitudinal effects on family functioning and youth emotional and behavioral health

AU - Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.

AU - Meca, Alan

AU - Unger, Jennifer B.

AU - Romero, Andrea J

AU - Gonzales-Backen, Melinda

AU - Piña-Watson, Brandy

AU - Cano, Miguel Ángel

AU - Zamboanga, Byron L.

AU - Rosiers, Sabrina E Des

AU - Soto, Daniel W.

AU - Villamar, Juan A.

AU - Lizzi, Karina M.

AU - Pattarroyo, Monica

AU - Schwartz, Seth J.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Latino parents can experience acculturation stressors, and according to the Family Stress Model (FSM), parent stress can influence youth mental health and substance use by negatively affecting family functioning. To understand how acculturation stressors come together and unfold over time to influence youth mental health and substance use outcomes, the current study investigated the trajectory of a latent parent acculturation stress factor and its influence on youth mental health and substance use via parent-and youth-reported family functioning. Data came from a 6-wave, school-based survey with 302 recent (<5 years) immigrant Latino parents (74% mothers, Mage = 41.09 years) and their adolescents (47% female, Mage = 14.51 years). Parents' reports of discrimination, negative context of reception, and acculturative stress loaded onto a latent factor of acculturation stress at each of the first 4 time points. Earlier levels of and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted worse youth-reported family functioning. Additionally, earlier levels of parent acculturation stress predicted worse parent-reported family functioning and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted better parent-reported family functioning. While youth-reported positive family functioning predicted higher self-esteem, lower symptoms of depression, and lower aggressive and rule-breaking behavior in youth, parent-reported family positive functioning predicted lower youth alcohol and cigarette use. Findings highlight the need for Latino youth preventive interventions to target parent acculturation stress and family functioning.

AB - Latino parents can experience acculturation stressors, and according to the Family Stress Model (FSM), parent stress can influence youth mental health and substance use by negatively affecting family functioning. To understand how acculturation stressors come together and unfold over time to influence youth mental health and substance use outcomes, the current study investigated the trajectory of a latent parent acculturation stress factor and its influence on youth mental health and substance use via parent-and youth-reported family functioning. Data came from a 6-wave, school-based survey with 302 recent (<5 years) immigrant Latino parents (74% mothers, Mage = 41.09 years) and their adolescents (47% female, Mage = 14.51 years). Parents' reports of discrimination, negative context of reception, and acculturative stress loaded onto a latent factor of acculturation stress at each of the first 4 time points. Earlier levels of and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted worse youth-reported family functioning. Additionally, earlier levels of parent acculturation stress predicted worse parent-reported family functioning and increases in parent acculturation stress predicted better parent-reported family functioning. While youth-reported positive family functioning predicted higher self-esteem, lower symptoms of depression, and lower aggressive and rule-breaking behavior in youth, parent-reported family positive functioning predicted lower youth alcohol and cigarette use. Findings highlight the need for Latino youth preventive interventions to target parent acculturation stress and family functioning.

KW - Acculturation stress

KW - Latino families

KW - Substance use

KW - Youth mental health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85003583799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85003583799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/fam0000223

DO - 10.1037/fam0000223

M3 - Article

C2 - 27819441

AN - SCOPUS:85003583799

VL - 30

SP - 966

EP - 976

JO - Journal of Family Psychology

JF - Journal of Family Psychology

SN - 0893-3200

IS - 8

ER -