Latino populations: A unique opportunity for the study of race, genetics, and social environment in epidemiological research

Esteban González Burchard, Luisa N. Borrell, Shweta Choudhry, Mariam Naqvi, Hui Ju Tsai, Jose R. Rodriguez-Santana, Rocio Chapela, Scott D. Rogers, Rui Mei, William Rodriguez-Cintron, Jose F. Arena, Rick Kittles, Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, Elad Ziv, Neil Risch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

208 Scopus citations

Abstract

Latinos are the largest minority population in the United States. Although usually classified as a single ethnic group by researchers, Latinos are heterogeneous from cultural, socioeconomic, and genetic perspectives. From a cultural and social perspective. Latinos represent a wide variety of national origins and ethnic and cultural groups, with a full spectrum of social class. From a genetic perspective, Latinos are descended from indigenous American, European, and African populations. We review the historical events that led to the formation of contemporary Latino populations and use results from recent genetic and clinical studies to illustrate the unique opportunity Latino groups offer for studying the interaction between racial, genetic, and environmental contributions to disease occurrence and drug response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2161-2168
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume95
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Latino populations: A unique opportunity for the study of race, genetics, and social environment in epidemiological research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    González Burchard, E., Borrell, L. N., Choudhry, S., Naqvi, M., Tsai, H. J., Rodriguez-Santana, J. R., Chapela, R., Rogers, S. D., Mei, R., Rodriguez-Cintron, W., Arena, J. F., Kittles, R., Perez-Stable, E. J., Ziv, E., & Risch, N. (2005). Latino populations: A unique opportunity for the study of race, genetics, and social environment in epidemiological research. American journal of public health, 95(12), 2161-2168. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2005.068668