Laxative use and incident falls, fractures and change in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative

Bernhard Haring, Mary Pettinger, Jennifer W Bea, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Ryan M. Carnahan, Judith K. Ockene, Moritz Wyler Von Ballmoos, Robert B. Wallace, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laxatives are among the most widely used over-the-counter medications in the United States but studies examining their potential hazardous side effects are sparse. Associations between laxative use and risk for fractures and change in bone mineral density [BMD] have not previously been investigated. Methods. This prospective analysis included 161,808 postmenopausal women (8907 users and 151,497 nonusers of laxatives) enrolled in the WHI Observational Study and Clinical Trials. Women were recruited from October 1, 1993, to December 31, 1998, at 40 clinical centers in the United States and were eligible if they were 50 to 79 years old and were postmenopausal at the time of enrollment. Medication inventories were obtained during in-person interviews at baseline and at the 3-year follow-up visit on everyone. Data on self-reported falls (≥2), fractures (hip and total fractures) were used. BMD was determined at baseline and year 3 at 3 of the 40 clinical centers of the WHI. Results: Age-adjusted rates of hip fractures and total fractures, but not for falls were similar between laxative users and non-users regardless of duration of laxative use. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for any laxative use were 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.10) for falls, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.85-1.22) for hip fractures and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.96-1.07) for total fractures. The BMD levels did not statistically differ between laxative users and nonusers at any skeletal site after 3-years intake. Conclusion: These findings support a modest association between laxative use and increase in the risk of falls but not for fractures. Its use did not decrease bone mineral density levels in postmenopausal women. Maintaining physical functioning, and providing adequate treatment of comorbidities that predispose individuals for falls should be considered as first measures to avoid potential negative consequences associated with laxative use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number38
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Laxatives
Women's Health
Bone Density
Hip Fractures
Confidence Intervals
Observational Studies
Comorbidity
Clinical Trials
Interviews
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Bone mineral density
  • Falls
  • Fractures
  • Laxative use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Laxative use and incident falls, fractures and change in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women : Results from the Women's Health Initiative. / Haring, Bernhard; Pettinger, Mary; Bea, Jennifer W; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Carnahan, Ryan M.; Ockene, Judith K.; Wyler Von Ballmoos, Moritz; Wallace, Robert B.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia.

In: BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 13, No. 1, 38, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haring, B, Pettinger, M, Bea, JW, Wactawski-Wende, J, Carnahan, RM, Ockene, JK, Wyler Von Ballmoos, M, Wallace, RB & Wassertheil-Smoller, S 2013, 'Laxative use and incident falls, fractures and change in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative', BMC Geriatrics, vol. 13, no. 1, 38. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2318-13-38
Haring, Bernhard ; Pettinger, Mary ; Bea, Jennifer W ; Wactawski-Wende, Jean ; Carnahan, Ryan M. ; Ockene, Judith K. ; Wyler Von Ballmoos, Moritz ; Wallace, Robert B. ; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia. / Laxative use and incident falls, fractures and change in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women : Results from the Women's Health Initiative. In: BMC Geriatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Laxatives are among the most widely used over-the-counter medications in the United States but studies examining their potential hazardous side effects are sparse. Associations between laxative use and risk for fractures and change in bone mineral density [BMD] have not previously been investigated. Methods. This prospective analysis included 161,808 postmenopausal women (8907 users and 151,497 nonusers of laxatives) enrolled in the WHI Observational Study and Clinical Trials. Women were recruited from October 1, 1993, to December 31, 1998, at 40 clinical centers in the United States and were eligible if they were 50 to 79 years old and were postmenopausal at the time of enrollment. Medication inventories were obtained during in-person interviews at baseline and at the 3-year follow-up visit on everyone. Data on self-reported falls (≥2), fractures (hip and total fractures) were used. BMD was determined at baseline and year 3 at 3 of the 40 clinical centers of the WHI. Results: Age-adjusted rates of hip fractures and total fractures, but not for falls were similar between laxative users and non-users regardless of duration of laxative use. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for any laxative use were 1.06 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.10) for falls, 1.02 (95{\%} CI, 0.85-1.22) for hip fractures and 1.01 (95{\%} CI, 0.96-1.07) for total fractures. The BMD levels did not statistically differ between laxative users and nonusers at any skeletal site after 3-years intake. Conclusion: These findings support a modest association between laxative use and increase in the risk of falls but not for fractures. Its use did not decrease bone mineral density levels in postmenopausal women. Maintaining physical functioning, and providing adequate treatment of comorbidities that predispose individuals for falls should be considered as first measures to avoid potential negative consequences associated with laxative use.",
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AU - Wactawski-Wende, Jean

AU - Carnahan, Ryan M.

AU - Ockene, Judith K.

AU - Wyler Von Ballmoos, Moritz

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N2 - Background: Laxatives are among the most widely used over-the-counter medications in the United States but studies examining their potential hazardous side effects are sparse. Associations between laxative use and risk for fractures and change in bone mineral density [BMD] have not previously been investigated. Methods. This prospective analysis included 161,808 postmenopausal women (8907 users and 151,497 nonusers of laxatives) enrolled in the WHI Observational Study and Clinical Trials. Women were recruited from October 1, 1993, to December 31, 1998, at 40 clinical centers in the United States and were eligible if they were 50 to 79 years old and were postmenopausal at the time of enrollment. Medication inventories were obtained during in-person interviews at baseline and at the 3-year follow-up visit on everyone. Data on self-reported falls (≥2), fractures (hip and total fractures) were used. BMD was determined at baseline and year 3 at 3 of the 40 clinical centers of the WHI. Results: Age-adjusted rates of hip fractures and total fractures, but not for falls were similar between laxative users and non-users regardless of duration of laxative use. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for any laxative use were 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.10) for falls, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.85-1.22) for hip fractures and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.96-1.07) for total fractures. The BMD levels did not statistically differ between laxative users and nonusers at any skeletal site after 3-years intake. Conclusion: These findings support a modest association between laxative use and increase in the risk of falls but not for fractures. Its use did not decrease bone mineral density levels in postmenopausal women. Maintaining physical functioning, and providing adequate treatment of comorbidities that predispose individuals for falls should be considered as first measures to avoid potential negative consequences associated with laxative use.

AB - Background: Laxatives are among the most widely used over-the-counter medications in the United States but studies examining their potential hazardous side effects are sparse. Associations between laxative use and risk for fractures and change in bone mineral density [BMD] have not previously been investigated. Methods. This prospective analysis included 161,808 postmenopausal women (8907 users and 151,497 nonusers of laxatives) enrolled in the WHI Observational Study and Clinical Trials. Women were recruited from October 1, 1993, to December 31, 1998, at 40 clinical centers in the United States and were eligible if they were 50 to 79 years old and were postmenopausal at the time of enrollment. Medication inventories were obtained during in-person interviews at baseline and at the 3-year follow-up visit on everyone. Data on self-reported falls (≥2), fractures (hip and total fractures) were used. BMD was determined at baseline and year 3 at 3 of the 40 clinical centers of the WHI. Results: Age-adjusted rates of hip fractures and total fractures, but not for falls were similar between laxative users and non-users regardless of duration of laxative use. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for any laxative use were 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.10) for falls, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.85-1.22) for hip fractures and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.96-1.07) for total fractures. The BMD levels did not statistically differ between laxative users and nonusers at any skeletal site after 3-years intake. Conclusion: These findings support a modest association between laxative use and increase in the risk of falls but not for fractures. Its use did not decrease bone mineral density levels in postmenopausal women. Maintaining physical functioning, and providing adequate treatment of comorbidities that predispose individuals for falls should be considered as first measures to avoid potential negative consequences associated with laxative use.

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