Learning of name-face associations in memory impaired patients: A comparison of different training procedures

Angelika I.T. Thoene, Elizabeth L. Glisky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare a mnemonic strategy based on concept-driven processing and explicit memory (i.e., verbal elaboration and imagery) to one based on data-driven processing and implicit memory (the method of vanishing cues) in a names and faces learning task. A third training condition that used video presentation was also included. Six American and six German patients with memory impairment attributable to brain injuries of different etiologies attempted to learn the associations between names and faces in each of the three conditions. The mnemonic strategy proved to be the most effective. Discussion focuses on the characteristics of the training procedures and on the nature of the to-be-learned materials as critical determinants of the effectiveness of different training techniques. (JINS, 1995, 1, 29-38.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1995

Keywords

  • Amnesia
  • Cognitive rehabilitation
  • Memory training
  • Method of vanishing cues
  • Mnemonic strategy
  • Name-face learning
  • Video

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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