Learning the Phonological Forms of New Words: Effects of Orthographic and Auditory Input

Rachel Hayes-Harb, Janet L Nicol, Jason Barker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between the phonological and orthographic representations of new words for adult learners. Three groups of native English speakers learned a set of auditorily-presented pseudowords along with pictures indicating their "meanings". They were later tested on their memory of the words via an auditory word-picture matching test. While all three groups of participants heard the same auditory stimuli and saw the same pictures, the groups differed with respect to the written stimuli that accompanied each item during training. Some participants were presented with written forms for the auditory labels that were consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form <kamad>, auditory form [kamed]), while others saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form <kamand>, auditory form [kamed]), and a third group of participants was presented with no written forms. Participants who saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions showed interference from the words' spelled forms at test. This finding provides evidence for a relationship between orthographic and phonological representations for newly-learned words.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-381
Number of pages15
JournalLanguage and Speech
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Learning
learning
stimulus
Group
interference
Orthographic
New Words
Hearing
evidence
English Spelling
Phonological Representations
Orthographic Representations

Keywords

  • language learning
  • orthography
  • phoneme-grapheme correspondence
  • phonology
  • second language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Learning the Phonological Forms of New Words : Effects of Orthographic and Auditory Input. / Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Nicol, Janet L; Barker, Jason.

In: Language and Speech, Vol. 53, No. 3, 2010, p. 367-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{034b8b2ca7d047cc8932cc82ff838ea5,
title = "Learning the Phonological Forms of New Words: Effects of Orthographic and Auditory Input",
abstract = "We investigated the relationship between the phonological and orthographic representations of new words for adult learners. Three groups of native English speakers learned a set of auditorily-presented pseudowords along with pictures indicating their {"}meanings{"}. They were later tested on their memory of the words via an auditory word-picture matching test. While all three groups of participants heard the same auditory stimuli and saw the same pictures, the groups differed with respect to the written stimuli that accompanied each item during training. Some participants were presented with written forms for the auditory labels that were consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), while others saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), and a third group of participants was presented with no written forms. Participants who saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions showed interference from the words' spelled forms at test. This finding provides evidence for a relationship between orthographic and phonological representations for newly-learned words.",
keywords = "language learning, orthography, phoneme-grapheme correspondence, phonology, second language",
author = "Rachel Hayes-Harb and Nicol, {Janet L} and Jason Barker",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1177/0023830910371460",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "367--381",
journal = "Language and Speech",
issn = "0023-8309",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Learning the Phonological Forms of New Words

T2 - Effects of Orthographic and Auditory Input

AU - Hayes-Harb, Rachel

AU - Nicol, Janet L

AU - Barker, Jason

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - We investigated the relationship between the phonological and orthographic representations of new words for adult learners. Three groups of native English speakers learned a set of auditorily-presented pseudowords along with pictures indicating their "meanings". They were later tested on their memory of the words via an auditory word-picture matching test. While all three groups of participants heard the same auditory stimuli and saw the same pictures, the groups differed with respect to the written stimuli that accompanied each item during training. Some participants were presented with written forms for the auditory labels that were consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), while others saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), and a third group of participants was presented with no written forms. Participants who saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions showed interference from the words' spelled forms at test. This finding provides evidence for a relationship between orthographic and phonological representations for newly-learned words.

AB - We investigated the relationship between the phonological and orthographic representations of new words for adult learners. Three groups of native English speakers learned a set of auditorily-presented pseudowords along with pictures indicating their "meanings". They were later tested on their memory of the words via an auditory word-picture matching test. While all three groups of participants heard the same auditory stimuli and saw the same pictures, the groups differed with respect to the written stimuli that accompanied each item during training. Some participants were presented with written forms for the auditory labels that were consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), while others saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions (e.g., spelled form , auditory form [kamed]), and a third group of participants was presented with no written forms. Participants who saw written forms that were not consistent with English spelling conventions showed interference from the words' spelled forms at test. This finding provides evidence for a relationship between orthographic and phonological representations for newly-learned words.

KW - language learning

KW - orthography

KW - phoneme-grapheme correspondence

KW - phonology

KW - second language

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955874633&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955874633&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0023830910371460

DO - 10.1177/0023830910371460

M3 - Article

C2 - 21033652

AN - SCOPUS:77955874633

VL - 53

SP - 367

EP - 381

JO - Language and Speech

JF - Language and Speech

SN - 0023-8309

IS - 3

ER -