Left-handedness and language lateralization in children

Jerzy P. Szaflarski, Akila Rajagopal, Mekibib Altaye, Anna W. Byars, Lisa Jacola, Vincent J. Schmithorst, Mark B. Schapiro, Elena M Plante, Scott K. Holland

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Abstract

This fMRI study investigated the development of language lateralization in left- and righthanded children between 5 and 18 years of age. Twenty-seven left-handed children (17 boys, 10 girls) and 54 age- and gender-matched right-handed children were included. We used functional MRI at 3 T and a verb generation task to measure hemispheric language dominance based on either frontal or temporo-parietal regions of interest (ROIs) defined for the entire group and applied on an individual basis. Based on the frontal ROI, in the left-handed group, 23 participants (85%) demonstrated left-hemispheric language lateralization, 3 (11%) demonstrated symmetric activation, and 1 (4%) demonstrated right-hemispheric lateralization. In contrast, 50 (93%) of the right-handed children showed left-hemispheric lateralization and 3 (6%) demonstrated a symmetric activation pattern, while one (2%) demonstrated a right-hemispheric lateralization. The corresponding values for the temporo-parietal ROI for the left-handed children were 18 (67%) left-dominant, 6 (22%) symmetric, 3 (11%) right-dominant and for the right-handed children 49 (91%), 4 (7%), 1 (2%), respectively. Left-hemispheric language lateralization increased with age in both groups but somewhat different lateralization trajectories were observed in girls when compared to boys. The incidence of atypical language lateralization in left-handed children in this study was similar to that reported in adults. We also found similar rates of increase in left-hemispheric language lateralization with age between groups (i.e., independent of handedness) indicating the presence of similar mechanisms for language lateralization in left- and right-handed children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-97
Number of pages13
JournalBrain Research
Volume1433
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2012

Fingerprint

Functional Laterality
Language
Parietal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Language Development
Age Groups
Incidence

Keywords

  • fMRI
  • Handedness
  • Language development
  • Language lateralization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Szaflarski, J. P., Rajagopal, A., Altaye, M., Byars, A. W., Jacola, L., Schmithorst, V. J., ... Holland, S. K. (2012). Left-handedness and language lateralization in children. Brain Research, 1433, 85-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.11.026

Left-handedness and language lateralization in children. / Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Rajagopal, Akila; Altaye, Mekibib; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Plante, Elena M; Holland, Scott K.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1433, 18.01.2012, p. 85-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szaflarski, JP, Rajagopal, A, Altaye, M, Byars, AW, Jacola, L, Schmithorst, VJ, Schapiro, MB, Plante, EM & Holland, SK 2012, 'Left-handedness and language lateralization in children', Brain Research, vol. 1433, pp. 85-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.11.026
Szaflarski JP, Rajagopal A, Altaye M, Byars AW, Jacola L, Schmithorst VJ et al. Left-handedness and language lateralization in children. Brain Research. 2012 Jan 18;1433:85-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.11.026
Szaflarski, Jerzy P. ; Rajagopal, Akila ; Altaye, Mekibib ; Byars, Anna W. ; Jacola, Lisa ; Schmithorst, Vincent J. ; Schapiro, Mark B. ; Plante, Elena M ; Holland, Scott K. / Left-handedness and language lateralization in children. In: Brain Research. 2012 ; Vol. 1433. pp. 85-97.
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