Lipoprotein metabolism in human peritoneal cells

Joy Winzerling, Zeinab E. Jouni, Donald J. McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feasibility of using human cells isolated from peritoneal dialysis effluent as a model for studying lipoprotein and cholesterol metabolism was investigated. Human peritoneal cells degraded low density lipoproteins (LDL) and acetylated LDL (acetyl-LDL) by saturable, high affinity receptor-mediated processes. Positive correlations of the percentage of macrophage cells with degradation rates of LDL (r = 0.742; p<0.05) and acetyl-LDL (r = 0.931; p<0.01) indicated that macrophage cells significantly contributed to lipoprotein degradation. LDL receptor-mediated degradation was calcium dependent, and sensitive to pronase and chloroquine treatments. The receptor exhibited specificity for lipoproteins containing apolipoprotein B (apoB) or apolipoprotein E (apoE). Exposure of cells to LDL for 24 hrs significantly down-regulated LDL receptor-mediated degradation. Acetyl-LDL receptor-mediated degradation was calcium independent, inhibited by chloroquine, and was sensitive to pronase and fucoidin treatments. The scavenger receptor exhibited specificity for only acetyl-LDL. These results demonstrate that human peritoneal cells can provide a source of human tissue macrophages suitable for studies of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism and offer the opportunity for comparison of metabolic characteristics of in vivo maturated macrophages with available macrophage-like cell lines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1631-1641
Number of pages11
JournalLife Sciences
Volume58
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 5 1996

Fingerprint

Macrophages
Metabolism
Lipoproteins
LDL Receptors
Degradation
Pronase
LDL Lipoproteins
Chloroquine
Cells
Calcium
Scavenger Receptors
Dialysis
Apolipoproteins B
Apolipoproteins E
Peritoneal Dialysis
Effluents
Tissue
acetyl-LDL
Cell Line
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • human peritoneal macrophages
  • low density lipoprotein receptor
  • scavenger receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Lipoprotein metabolism in human peritoneal cells. / Winzerling, Joy; Jouni, Zeinab E.; McNamara, Donald J.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 58, No. 19, 05.04.1996, p. 1631-1641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winzerling, Joy ; Jouni, Zeinab E. ; McNamara, Donald J. / Lipoprotein metabolism in human peritoneal cells. In: Life Sciences. 1996 ; Vol. 58, No. 19. pp. 1631-1641.
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