Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet

P. Jeffrey Brantingham, John W Olsen, George B. Schaller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Archaeological evidence from the Chang Tang Reserve suggests that humans may have first colonized the Tibetan Plateau during the late Pleistocene. Blade, bladelet and microblade technologies are found as surface assemblages in a variety of contexts above 4500 m elevation. The lack of modern analogues for foraging populations in high-elevation environments brings about a reconsideration of the diversity and organization of Pleistocene hunter-gatherer adaptations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-327
Number of pages9
JournalAntiquity
Volume75
Issue number288
StatePublished - Jun 2001

Fingerprint

Tibet
organization
lack
evidence
Lithic Assemblages
Elevation
Bladelets
Pleistocene
Microblade Technology
Late Pleistocene
Hunter-gatherers
Archaeological Evidence
Assemblages
Foraging
Blade
Tibetan Plateau

Keywords

  • Blade technology
  • Foraging adaptations
  • Late Pleistocene
  • Microblade technology
  • Tibetan Plateau

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Brantingham, P. J., Olsen, J. W., & Schaller, G. B. (2001). Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet. Antiquity, 75(288), 319-327.

Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet. / Brantingham, P. Jeffrey; Olsen, John W; Schaller, George B.

In: Antiquity, Vol. 75, No. 288, 06.2001, p. 319-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brantingham, PJ, Olsen, JW & Schaller, GB 2001, 'Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet', Antiquity, vol. 75, no. 288, pp. 319-327.
Brantingham PJ, Olsen JW, Schaller GB. Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet. Antiquity. 2001 Jun;75(288):319-327.
Brantingham, P. Jeffrey ; Olsen, John W ; Schaller, George B. / Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet. In: Antiquity. 2001 ; Vol. 75, No. 288. pp. 319-327.
@article{2ae4e9b598ce4abda75b4710ec282518,
title = "Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet",
abstract = "Archaeological evidence from the Chang Tang Reserve suggests that humans may have first colonized the Tibetan Plateau during the late Pleistocene. Blade, bladelet and microblade technologies are found as surface assemblages in a variety of contexts above 4500 m elevation. The lack of modern analogues for foraging populations in high-elevation environments brings about a reconsideration of the diversity and organization of Pleistocene hunter-gatherer adaptations.",
keywords = "Blade technology, Foraging adaptations, Late Pleistocene, Microblade technology, Tibetan Plateau",
author = "Brantingham, {P. Jeffrey} and Olsen, {John W} and Schaller, {George B.}",
year = "2001",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "319--327",
journal = "Antiquity",
issn = "0003-598X",
publisher = "Antiquity Ltd",
number = "288",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lithic assemblages from the Chang Tang region, Northern Tibet

AU - Brantingham, P. Jeffrey

AU - Olsen, John W

AU - Schaller, George B.

PY - 2001/6

Y1 - 2001/6

N2 - Archaeological evidence from the Chang Tang Reserve suggests that humans may have first colonized the Tibetan Plateau during the late Pleistocene. Blade, bladelet and microblade technologies are found as surface assemblages in a variety of contexts above 4500 m elevation. The lack of modern analogues for foraging populations in high-elevation environments brings about a reconsideration of the diversity and organization of Pleistocene hunter-gatherer adaptations.

AB - Archaeological evidence from the Chang Tang Reserve suggests that humans may have first colonized the Tibetan Plateau during the late Pleistocene. Blade, bladelet and microblade technologies are found as surface assemblages in a variety of contexts above 4500 m elevation. The lack of modern analogues for foraging populations in high-elevation environments brings about a reconsideration of the diversity and organization of Pleistocene hunter-gatherer adaptations.

KW - Blade technology

KW - Foraging adaptations

KW - Late Pleistocene

KW - Microblade technology

KW - Tibetan Plateau

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034761242&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034761242&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034761242

VL - 75

SP - 319

EP - 327

JO - Antiquity

JF - Antiquity

SN - 0003-598X

IS - 288

ER -