Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mixture of warm and cool season grasses, and some browse species provide a favorable forage resource for livestock production. Grazing systems, breeding in late summer-fall, and supplementation of phosphorus, protein, and energy can improve livestock production. Because nearly 80% of the grazing in the woodland occurs on federal land, grazing management must accommodate conflicting uses such as wildlife, rare species, oak recruitment, and recreation. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeneral Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
Pages57-64
Number of pages8
EditionRM-218
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

grazing management
livestock farming
woodland
grazing
rare species
reproductive strategy
forage
grass
phosphorus
protein
summer
resource
energy
oak
conflicting use
land
wildlife
recreation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

McClaran, M., Allen, L. S., & Ruyle, G. B. (1992). Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona. In General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (RM-218 ed., pp. 57-64)

Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona. / McClaran, Mitchel; Allen, L. S.; Ruyle, George B.

General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. RM-218. ed. 1992. p. 57-64.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McClaran, M, Allen, LS & Ruyle, GB 1992, Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona. in General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. RM-218 edn, pp. 57-64.
McClaran M, Allen LS, Ruyle GB. Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona. In General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. RM-218 ed. 1992. p. 57-64
McClaran, Mitchel ; Allen, L. S. ; Ruyle, George B. / Livestock production and grazing management in the encinal oak woodlands of Arizona. General Technical Report - US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. RM-218. ed. 1992. pp. 57-64
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