Localization of complement component 3 on Streptococcus pneumoniae

Anti-capsular antibody causes complement deposition on the pneumococcal capsule

E. J. Brown, Keith A Joiner, R. M. Cole, M. Berger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously shown that complement component 3 (C3) deposited onto encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by anti-capsular antibody (Ab) is a more efficient opsonin in vitro and in vivo than C3 deposited by anti-cell wall Ab. In the present study, we explored the cellular location of C3b molecules that differ in opsonic efficiency by using avidin-ferritin to localize biotinylated Ab and C3 molecules on S. pneumoniae for electron microscopy. Anti-cell wall Ab and C3b molecules deposited by this Ab on unencapsulated S. pneumoniae were localized to S. pneumoniae cell walls. Anti-capsular Ab and C3b deposited by this Ab were seen in clusters on encapsulated S. pneumoniae at a distance from the cell wall. However, no avidin-ferritin staining of encapsulated S. pneumoniae was seen on incubation with biotinyl-anti-cell wall Ab, biotinylated C3 fixed by anti-cell wall Ab, or nonimmune serum containing biotinyl-C3. In each case, uptake of the biotinylated component was proven by radioactivity measurements, since biotinylated Ab and C3 were also radiolabeled with 125I. When avidin-ferritin did not bind to biotinylated components, Ouchterlony analysis indicated that C3 was bound to cell wall components on the encapsulated organisms. Thus, we conclude that, for encapsulated S. pneumoniae, opsonically efficient C3b molecules, deposited by anti-capsular Ab, are located on the S. pneumoniae capsule, whereas the opsonically inefficient C3b molecules deposited by anti-cell wall Ab or nonimmune serum are located on the cell wall. A major reason for the increased virulence of encapsulated compared to unencapsulated S. pneumoniae is that, in the absence of anti-capsular Ab, the S. pneumoniae capsule interferes with the recognition of cell wall-bound C3b molecules by phagocytic cell receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-409
Number of pages7
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume39
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Complement C3
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Cell Wall
Capsules
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Antibodies
Avidin
Ferritins
Opsonin Proteins
Cellular Structures
Phagocytes
Serum
Radioactivity
Virulence
Electron Microscopy
Staining and Labeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Localization of complement component 3 on Streptococcus pneumoniae : Anti-capsular antibody causes complement deposition on the pneumococcal capsule. / Brown, E. J.; Joiner, Keith A; Cole, R. M.; Berger, M.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 39, No. 1, 1983, p. 403-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "We have previously shown that complement component 3 (C3) deposited onto encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by anti-capsular antibody (Ab) is a more efficient opsonin in vitro and in vivo than C3 deposited by anti-cell wall Ab. In the present study, we explored the cellular location of C3b molecules that differ in opsonic efficiency by using avidin-ferritin to localize biotinylated Ab and C3 molecules on S. pneumoniae for electron microscopy. Anti-cell wall Ab and C3b molecules deposited by this Ab on unencapsulated S. pneumoniae were localized to S. pneumoniae cell walls. Anti-capsular Ab and C3b deposited by this Ab were seen in clusters on encapsulated S. pneumoniae at a distance from the cell wall. However, no avidin-ferritin staining of encapsulated S. pneumoniae was seen on incubation with biotinyl-anti-cell wall Ab, biotinylated C3 fixed by anti-cell wall Ab, or nonimmune serum containing biotinyl-C3. In each case, uptake of the biotinylated component was proven by radioactivity measurements, since biotinylated Ab and C3 were also radiolabeled with 125I. When avidin-ferritin did not bind to biotinylated components, Ouchterlony analysis indicated that C3 was bound to cell wall components on the encapsulated organisms. Thus, we conclude that, for encapsulated S. pneumoniae, opsonically efficient C3b molecules, deposited by anti-capsular Ab, are located on the S. pneumoniae capsule, whereas the opsonically inefficient C3b molecules deposited by anti-cell wall Ab or nonimmune serum are located on the cell wall. A major reason for the increased virulence of encapsulated compared to unencapsulated S. pneumoniae is that, in the absence of anti-capsular Ab, the S. pneumoniae capsule interferes with the recognition of cell wall-bound C3b molecules by phagocytic cell receptors.",
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AB - We have previously shown that complement component 3 (C3) deposited onto encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by anti-capsular antibody (Ab) is a more efficient opsonin in vitro and in vivo than C3 deposited by anti-cell wall Ab. In the present study, we explored the cellular location of C3b molecules that differ in opsonic efficiency by using avidin-ferritin to localize biotinylated Ab and C3 molecules on S. pneumoniae for electron microscopy. Anti-cell wall Ab and C3b molecules deposited by this Ab on unencapsulated S. pneumoniae were localized to S. pneumoniae cell walls. Anti-capsular Ab and C3b deposited by this Ab were seen in clusters on encapsulated S. pneumoniae at a distance from the cell wall. However, no avidin-ferritin staining of encapsulated S. pneumoniae was seen on incubation with biotinyl-anti-cell wall Ab, biotinylated C3 fixed by anti-cell wall Ab, or nonimmune serum containing biotinyl-C3. In each case, uptake of the biotinylated component was proven by radioactivity measurements, since biotinylated Ab and C3 were also radiolabeled with 125I. When avidin-ferritin did not bind to biotinylated components, Ouchterlony analysis indicated that C3 was bound to cell wall components on the encapsulated organisms. Thus, we conclude that, for encapsulated S. pneumoniae, opsonically efficient C3b molecules, deposited by anti-capsular Ab, are located on the S. pneumoniae capsule, whereas the opsonically inefficient C3b molecules deposited by anti-cell wall Ab or nonimmune serum are located on the cell wall. A major reason for the increased virulence of encapsulated compared to unencapsulated S. pneumoniae is that, in the absence of anti-capsular Ab, the S. pneumoniae capsule interferes with the recognition of cell wall-bound C3b molecules by phagocytic cell receptors.

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